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Rodgers, L (2003)
Publisher: Nottingham Trent University
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
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    • 6 Broadsides consisted of a one-page "news" sheet, the accuracy of the news often being in doubt. These broadsides are often referred to as broadsheets, half or quartersides, reflecting the actual size of the paper used. They invariably cost one penny, although the same publishers would often reprint the information, with additional new material in more expensive pamphlets.
    • 7 Extraordinary Occurance, and Supposed Murder etc. Edinburgh 3d Nov, 1828 held in National Library of Scotland: West Port Murders, Vol. IV, Miscellaneous, L. C. 1573 (1).
    • 8 Extracted in MacGregor, G., The History of Burke and Hare and of the Resurrectionist Times (1884) (Thomas Morison Glasgow and Hamilton Adams & Co, London, 1884) p. 114.
    • 9 Per West Port Murders, Vol. V, Miscellaneous, L.C. 1574 (16), National Library of Scotland.
    • 10 A collection of cuttings chiefly from Edinburgh newspapers, relating to the Burke and Hare murders (1828-1841) National Library of Scotland R.Y.III.a.6(l).
    • " Per West Port Murders, Vol. IV, Miscellaneous, L.C. 1573 (15), National Library of Scotland.
    • 12 See for example The Official Confessions of William Burke (1829, Shillies Library) in National Library of Scotland, West Port Murders, Vol. IV, L.C. 1573 (30), one of the many "True or Official Confessions" allegedly made by Burke before his execution on 28 Jan 1829.
    • 13 For full terms of reference of the public inquiry see Chapter 1, para. 14, Learning from Bristol: the report of the public inquiry into children's heart surgery at the Bristol Royal Infirmary 1984-1995, C M 5207, HMSO, London.
    • 14 See Chapter 3, para. 1.1, The Royal Liverpool Children's Inquiry Report (London: HMSO, 30 January 2001).
    • 15 The inquiry being announced on 3 December 1999 by Lord Hunt, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State. For full details of the term of reference see Chapter 1, para. 4.1, The Royal Liverpool Children's Inquiry Report, ibid.
    • 16 It is interesting to note that the majority of parents involved with the Bristol Royal Infirmary Inquiry had indeed completed and signed a consent form. Indeed in the Interim Report, Part II, para. 43, the panel states that of the 265 post-mortems, 220 "were coroners' post-mortems for which consent and, hence, a signed consent form [was] not required. In relation to the 45 hospital post-mortems, the Inquiry has verified that in all but three cases parents' written consent was given; there was no suggestion in these three cases that consent was not obtained. In a further case, whilst the consent form was missing, the parent recalls giving consent". What the issue here concerned was the fact that those parents did not understand, or have explained to them, the meaning of the consent documentation that they signed.
    • 17 See for example Balfour, C. L., Women and The Temperance Reformation, (London, 1849) and Harrison, B., Drink and The Victorians: The Temperance Question in England 1815-1872, (Faber and Faber, London, 1971).
    • 18 The Newgate Calendar, extracted from www.exclassics.org/newgate/ng601.htm on 7 March 2003.
    • 19 Extraordinary Occurance, and Supposed Murder etc., op. cit.
    • 20 Burke and Hare were never charged with the murder of Daft Jamie, but the circumstantial evidence was such that in all likelihood the pair did kill and sell his body to Dr. Knox.
    • 21 A laconic narrative of the life and Death of James Wilson, known by the name of Daft Jamie. To which is added a few Anecdotes (published W. Smith, 1829) held by the National Library of Scotland in West Port Murders, Vol. IV, Miscellaneous, L.C. 1573 (5).
    • 22 Extract from press cutting, The Edinburgh Murders (Further Particulars) in West Port Murders, Miscellaneous, Edinburgh City Library, Y R A 637.
    • 41 See note 30.
    • 42 Life and Transactions of murderer Burke and his Associates, author and date unknown, National Library of Scotland, R . Y . III. a. 6(26).
    • 43 See note 5.
    • 44 Author unknown, The Murders of the Close: A Tragedy of Real Life, (Cowie and Strange, Paternoster Row and Fetter Lane, London, 1829) at p. 169.
    • 45 MacGregor, C , op. cit.
    • 46 Wag, Phil., A Timely Hint to Anatomical Practitioners, and their Associates - The Resurrectionists, A New Song (Tune: Macpherson's Farewell), date unknown, published W. Smith, National Library of Scotland, West Port Murders, Vol. IV, Miscellaneous, L.C. 1573 12.
    • 61 Sir Astley Cooper, Minutes of Evidence, Report from the Select Committee of Anatomy, ibid at pp. 18 and 19. The reference to Baron Hullock refers to an indictment for conspiracy to procure a disinterred body for the purposes of dissection: /?. v. Davies and another, reported in The Times, 19 May 1828 and included in the Appendices to the Select Committee Report.
    • 62 Minutes of Evidence, op. cit., at p. 46.
    • 63 Communication from Dr. Knox to the Editor of the Caledonian Mercury, dated 17 March 1829, National Library of Scotland, R . Y . III. a. 6.
    • 64 Minutes of Evidence, The Report from the Select Committee on Anatomy, op. cit. at p. 93.
    • 65 It is not unreasonable to assume a working knowledge of statutory law for a stipendiary magistrate at this point in time. Although for some time the magistrates attached to the nine police offices in London had no legal background, being aldermen etc., after Robert Peel became Home Secretary in 1822 he adopted the practice of appointing lawyers as police magistrates. See further Bentley, D., English Criminal Justice in the Nineteenth Century (Hambledon Press, London, 1998).
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