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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Publisher: University of Huddersfield
Languages: English
Types: Book
Subjects: HN, HQ, HV
Worldwide, unprecedented numbers of people are being imprisoned and in many countries incarceration is on the increase (Walmsley, 2009); indeed ‘more parents than ever are behind bars’ (Murray et al., 2012) and each year, an estimated 800,000 children within the newly-expanded European Union are separated from an incarcerated parent. Despite this, the psychosocial impact on children is little known and rarely considered in sentencing even though the evidence to date suggests that children whose parents are imprisoned are exposed to triple jeopardy through break-up of the family, financial hardship, stigma and secrecy, leading to adverse social and educational repercussions. The rationale for the study of the impact of parental imprisonment is underscored by the findings of a recent meta-analysis of studies of children of prisoners (Murray et al. 2012). This systematic review synthesized empirical evidence on the associations between parental incarceration and children’s later behavioural, educational and health outcomes from 40 studies involving a total of over 7,000 children of prisoners.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 1. COPING: Children of Prisoners, Interventions and Mitigations to Strengthen Mental Health. Results from a Four-Country Survey of Mental Health, Wellbeing and Quality of Life
    • 2. COPING: Children of Prisoners, Interventions and Mitigations to Strengthen Mental Health. Perspectives of Children, Parents and Carers - Overview Report
    • 3. COPING: Children of Prisoners, Interventions and Mitigations to Strengthen Mental Health. Perspectives of Children, Parents and Carers - German Report
    • 4. COPING: Children of Prisoners, Interventions and Mitigations to Strengthen Mental Health. Perspectives of Children, Parents and Carers - Romania Report
    • 5. COPING: Children of Prisoners, Interventions and Mitigations to Strengthen Mental Health. Perspectives of Children, Parents and Carers - Swedish Report
    • 6. COPING: Children of Prisoners, Interventions and Mitigations to Strengthen Mental Health. Perspectives of Children, Parents and Carers - UK Report
    • 7. COPING: Children of Prisoners, Interventions and Mitigations to Strengthen Mental Health. Mapping of Interventions and Services across Germany, Romania, the UK and Sweden
    • 8. COPING: Children of Prisoners, Interventions and Mitigations to Strengthen Mental Health. Aligning Children's Needs to Interventions and Services - a four-country analysis
    • 9. COPING: Children of Prisoners, Interventions and Mitigations to Strengthen Mental Health. Recommendations at the Pan European and Country Level (Germany, Romania, UK and Sweden)
    • 10.Ethical Procedures, Issues and Challenges in the COPING Study of Children of Prisoners
    • 11. Disseminating Knowledge about Children of Prisoners. The COPING Dissemination Strategy
    • 12. Conference Outcome Report. Coping with a Parent in Prison: An Agenda for Policy
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

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