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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Publisher: Springer
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: dewey570, dewey610
The main aim of this study was to investigate a possible functional connection between sigma-1 receptors and voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in human breast cancer cells. The hypothesis was that sigma-1 drugs could alter the metastatic properties of breast cancer cells via the VGSC. Evidence was found for expression of sigma-1 receptor and neonatal Nav1.5 (nNav1.5) expression in both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Sigma-1 drugs (SKF10047 and dimethyltryptamine) did not affect cell proliferation or migration but significantly reduced adhesion to the substrate. Silencing sigma-1 receptor expression by siRNA similarly reduced the adhesion. Blocking nNav1.5 activity with a polyclonal antibody (NESOpAb) targeting an extracellular region of nNav1.5 also reduced the adhesion in both cell lines. Importantly, the results of combined treatments with NESOpAb and a sigma-1 drug or sigma-1 siRNA suggested that both treatments targeted the same mechanism. The possibility was tested, therefore, that the sigma-1 receptor and the nNav1.5 channel formed a physical, functional complex. This suggestion was supported by the results of co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, application of sigma-1 drugs to the cells reduced the surface expression of nNav1.5 protein, which could explain how sigma-1 receptor activation could alter the metastatic behaviour of breast cancer cells. Overall, these results are consistent with the idea of a sigma-1 protein behaving like either a "chaperone" or a regulatory subunit associated with nNav1.5.

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