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Publisher: Elsevier
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: S1
Plutella xylostella was the first insect for which resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis was reported in the field, yet despite many studies on the nature of this resistance phenotype its genetic and molecular basis remains elusive. Many different factors have been proposed as contributing to resistance, although in many cases it has not been possible to establish a causal link. Indeed, there are so many studies published that it has become very difficult to “see the wood for the trees”. This article will attempt to clarify our current understanding of Bt resistance in P. xylostella and consider the criteria that are used when validating a particular model.
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    • 31. Tanaka S, Miyamoto K, Noda H, Jurat-Fuentes JL, Yoshizawa Y, Endo H, Sato R: The ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C member 2 in Bombyx mori larvae is a functional receptor for Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis. Febs Journal 2013, 280:1782-1794.
    • ** Evidence is provided, to support previous genetic mapping data, that ABCC2 has a direct role to play in the Bt mechanism of action.
  • No related research data.
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