LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects: HM, BL
This study provides a contribution to the sociology of religion by examining the\ud relationship between Hinduism and the Internet - an area largely neglected by scholars\ud of religion and the Internet. A theoretical discussion as to the suitability of cyberspace\ud for Hinduism - which concludes that there is a high level of compatibility - is\ud followed by a discussion of embodiment (a relatively neglected topic in sociology) in\ud Hinduism in order to assess whether online religious activity which does not require\ud full embodiment could be problematic. Although there is no natural fit between\ud Hinduism and online religious activity, such activity is extensive; and this gives rise to\ud a number of empirical research questions about online practices and their implications\ud for Hinduism 'offline'.\ud Empirical research was carried out both online and 'offline'. Online, data was obtained\ud through the utilisation of innovative research methods which were able to map\ud Hinduism on the WWW and uncover the processes that are occurring. An important\ud finding was that a relatively small number of Hindu organisations are effectively\ud monopolising Hinduism online. Significant websites were also analysed. 'Offline',\ud research was carried out at mandirs (Hindu Temples) in India. The prime research\ud method used was the semi-structured interview. The informants were high-ranking\ud mandir officials. Owners of web sites offering a puja (ritual honouring a deity) service\ud were also interviewed. The online and 'offline' research did not constitute discrete lines\ud of enquiry, and findings were analysed together in the light of sociological theories of\ud embodiment and globalisation, and rational choice theory. These theories contribute to\ud the understanding of processes that are occurring in Hinduism and, in turn, the findings\ud suggested revisions of the theoretical ideas.\ud The main conclusion is that despite globalisation and the pre-eminent role that the\ud Internet plays in it - contrary to the assertions of some globalisation theorists -local\ud sites of Hindu practice do not necessarily decline in importance. Instead, there is an\ud interpenetration of the local and the global as a result of online Hinduism.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • Abraham, M. (April S, 2001), 'World's Hindus Can Invoke Heaven via India Website' Reuters, http://www.wwrn.org/sparse.php?idd=13429, accessed Apri121, 2006.
    • Abram, D. et al. (2003), The Rough Guide to India (London: Rough Guides).
    • al-Oadah, S.S. (n.d.), 'The Partnership Between Body and Soul', http://www.missionislam.com/healthlpartnershipbodysoullhtm. accessed December 12, 2005.
    • Allen, R.E. (ed.) (1990), The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Current English (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
    • Ammerman, N.T. (1997), 'Religious Choices and Religious Vitality - The Market and Beyond', in Young, L.A. (ed.), Rational Choice Theory and ReligionSummary and Assessment (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 119-132.
    • An, A. (July 17, 2001), 'Ananda Marga Yoga Society' , New Religious Movements Homepage, http://religiousmovements.lib.virginia.edulnrms/anan.html, accessed June 26, 2005.
    • Anonymous (1948). 'The Spiritual Path in Islam', http://www.jamaat.org/islamllslamSpiritual.html, accessed December 12,2005.
    • --- (May, 2000), 'Terminology and Glossary', Ethnic and Racial Studies, 23 (3),401- 406.
    • --- (June 21,2000), 'Religious Outsourcing Goes to the Heavens', PT! in The Tribune, http://www.tribuneindia.com/2004/20040622Ibiz.htm. accessed October 19, 2004.
    • --- (October 16,2000), 'God's Only a Click Away', India Today, http://www.saranam.com/press2.asp. accessed October 15.2004.
    • --- (December 14,2000), 'Rich Assortments', The Hindu, http://www.saranam.com/press3.asp. accessed October 19, 2004.
    • --- (December 26, 2000), 'Hurry Om! God Lives in a Cybercafe and He Downloads Real Fast', rediffcom, http://www.saranam.com/press4.asp. accessed October 15,2004.
    • --- (January 3, 2001), 'Hinduism Online', Asia Today, http://www.asiasource.orglnews/at mp 02.cfm?newid=39841, accessed January 28, 2005.
    • --- (November 28, 2002), 'Buddha Bar Upsets Swedish Hindus', AP, http://www.wwrn.org/sparse.php?idd=7109, accessed June 15,2005.
    • --- (June 12,2003), 'Crematorium to Offer Webcast of Last Rites', lANS, http://religioscope.info/article 171.shtml, accessed October 22, 2004.
    • --- (June 16,2003), 'Priests Sulk as Jharkhand Temple Goes Online'. lANS, http://religioscope.info/article 17S.shtml, accessed October 22,2004.
    • --- (July 1.2003), 'Religion Offers Online "Satsang'", The Times of India, http://www.wwrn.org/sparse.php?idd=9011&c=8S, accessed January 24, 2005.
    • --- (May 8, 2004), 'Supreme Court to Define "Essential" Part of Religion' ,lANS, http://wwrn.org/parse.php?idd=97468&c=85, accessed February 1,2005.
    • --- (June 22, 2004), 'Outsourcing Gets Religion in India', BBC News, http://news.bbc.co. uklgo/pr/fr/-/2lhilbusiness/3 829161.stm, accessed October 19,2004.
    • --- (November 12,2004), 'Shankaracharya in Jail- Shock, Anger Across Nation', lANS in The Times of India Online, Chicago Press).
    • Appadurai (1990), 'Disjuncture and Difference in the Global Cultural Economy', in Beynon, J. and Dunkerley, D. (eds.) (2000), Globalization - The Reader (London: The Athlone Press), 92-100.
    • Arnold, P.P. (2002), 'Determining the Place of Religion: Native American Traditions and the WWW', Religion, 32, 337-41.
    • Arthur, s. (2002). 'Technophilia and Nature Religion: The Growth of a Paradox', Religion, 32, 303-14.
    • Asad, T. (1997), 'Remarks on the Anthropology of the Body', in Coakley, S. (ed.), Religion and the Body (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 42-52.
    • Bainbridge, W.S. (1997), The Sociology of Religious Movements (London: Routledge).
    • --- (2000), 'Religious Ethnography on the World Wide Web', in Hadden, J.K. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion on the Internet: Research Prospects and Promises (New York: JAI), 55-80.
    • Balsamo, A. (2000), 'The Virtual Body in Cyberspace', in Bell, D. and Kennedy, B.M. (eds.), The Cybercultures Reader (London: Routledge), 489-503.
    • Banerjea, A.K. (1962), Philosophy ofGorakhnath - with Goraksha-Vacana-Sangraha (Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass).
    • Barker, E. (1999), 'NRMs: Their Incidence and Significance', in Wilson, B. and Cresswell, J. (eds.), New Religious Movements: Challenge and Response (London: Routledge), 15-31.
    • --- (2005), 'Crossing the Boundary - New Challenges to Religious Authority and Control as a Consequence of Access to the Internet', in Hejsgaard, M.T. and Warburg, M. (eds.) Religion and Cyberspace (Abingdon: Routledge), 67-85.
    • Barrett, D.V. (2003), The New Believers: Sects, Cults and Alternative Religions (London: Cassell Illustrated).
    • Baudrillard, J. (1983a), 'Simulacra and Simulations', in Poster, M. (ed.) (1988), Jean Baudrillard - Selected Writings (Cambridge: Polity Press), 166-84.
    • --- (1983b), 'Fatal Strategies', in Poster, M. (ed.) (1988), Jean Baudrillard - Selected Writings (Cambridge: Polity Press), 185-206.
    • Baumann, M. (1999), 'The Hindu Diasporas in Europe and an Analysis of Key Diasporic Patterns', in Rukmani, T.S. (ed.), Hindu Diaspora - Global Perspectives (Montreal: Chair in Hindu Studies, Concordia University), 59-79.
    • --- (2001), 'Buddhism in Europe: Past, Present, Prospects', in Beckerlegge, O. (ed.), From Sacred Text to Internet (Milton Keynes: The Open University), 295-317.
    • Beaulieu, A. (2005), 'Sociable Hyperlinks: An Ethnographic Approach to Connectivity' , in Hine, C. (ed.), Virtual Methods - Issues in Social Research on the Internet (Oxford: Berg), 183-197.
    • Beck, U. (2000), What is Globalization? (Cambridge: Polity Press).
    • Becker, O. (1986), 'The Economic Approach to Human Behaviour', in Elster, F. (ed.), Rational Choice, (Oxford: Basil Blackwell), 108-122.
    • Beckerlegge, O. (2001a), 'Introduction', in Beckerlegge, O. (ed.), From Sacred Text to Internet (Milton Keynes: The Open University), 1-7.
    • --- (2001b), 'Hindu Sacred Images for the Mass Market', in Beckerlegge, O. (ed.), From Sacred Text to Internet (Milton Keynes: The Open University), 57-116.
    • --- (2001c), 'Computer-mediated Religion: Religion on the Internet at the End of the Twenty-first Century', in Beckerlegge, O. (ed.), From Sacred Text to Internet (Milton Keynes: The Open University), 219-64.
    • Beckford, J.A. (1985), Cult Controversies - The Societal Response to New Religious Movements (London: Tavistock).
    • --- (1989), Religion and Advanced Industrial Society (London: Unwin Hyman).
    • --- (1992), 'Religion, Modernity and Post-modernity', in Wilson, B. (ed.), Religion: Contemporary Issues - The All Souls Seminars in the Sociology of Religion (London: Bellew Publishing), 11-23.
    • --- (1999a), 'Postmodernity, High Modernity and New Modernity: Three Concepts in Search of Religion', in Flanagan, K. and Jupp, P.C. (eds.), Postmodernity, Sociology and Religion (Basingstoke: MacMillan), 30-47.
    • --- (1999b), 'Rational Choice Theory and Prison Chaplaincy: The Chaplain's Dilemma', British Journal of Sociology, 50 (4), 671-685.
    • --- (2000a), 'Religious Movements and Globalization', in Cohen, R. and Rai, S.M. (eds.), Global Social Movements (London: The Athlone Press), 165-83.
    • --- (2000b), "'Start Together and Finish Together": Shifts in the Premises and Paradigms Underlying the Scientific Study of Religion', Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 39 (4), 481-95.
    • --- (2001), 'Social Movements as Free-Floating Religious Phenomena', in Fenn, R.K. (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Sociology of Religion (Oxford: Blackwell), 229-248.
    • --- (2003), Social Theory and Religon (Cambridge University Press).
    • Bedell, K. (1998), 'Religion and the Internet: Reflections on Research Strategies' (paper presented to the annual meeting of the Religious Research Association, Montreal, Quebec [November 6-8, 1998]), http://www.religionresearch.orglrrapaper.html, accessed May 18,2005.
    • --- (2000), 'Dispatches from the Electronic Frontier: Explorations of Mainline Protestant Use of the Internet', in Hadden, lK. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion on the Internet: Research Prospects and Promises (New York: JAI), 183-203.
    • Bell, D. (2000), 'Introduction 1- Cybercultures Reader: A User's Guide', in Bell, D. and Kennedy, B.M (eds.), The Cybercultures Reader (London: Routledge), 1- 12.
    • Bell, D. and Kennedy, B.M. (eds.) (2000), The Cybercultures Reader (London: Routledge).
    • Benedikt, M. (2000), 'Cyberspace: First Steps', in Bell, D. and Kennedy, B.M. (eds.), The Cybercultutures Reader (London: Routledge), 29-44.
    • Benjamin, A. (1981), The Helping Interview (Boston: Houghton Miffiin).
    • Berger, A. and Ezzy, D. (2004), 'The Internet as Virtual Spiritual Community: Teen Witches in the United States and Australia', in Dawson, L.L and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 175-88.
    • Berger, R. (2004), 'Digital Media Futures', in Gauntlett, D. and Horsley, R. (eds.), Web.Studies (London: Arnold), 274-283.
    • Berthelot, J.M. (1991), 'Sociological Discourse and the Body', in Featherstone, M., Hepworth, M. and Turner, B.S. (eds.), The Body - Social Process and Cultural Theory (London: Sage), 390-404.
    • Beynon, J. and Dunkerley, D. (2000), 'General Introduction', in Beynon, J. and Dunkerley, D. (eds.), Globalization - The Reader (London: The Athlone Press).
    • Bhatt, C. (1997), Liberation and Purity: Race, New Religious Movements and the Ethics of Post modernity (London: UCL Press).
    • --- (2001), Hindu Nationalism - Origins, Ideologies, and Modern Myths (Oxford: Berg).
    • Bohmstedt, G.W. (1983), 'Measurement', in Rossi, P.H., Wright, J.D. and Anderson, A.B. (eds.), Handbook of Survey Research (New YorkILondon: Academic Press), 70-121.
    • Bradley, R (1997), 'Religion in Cyberspace - Building on the Past' (paper presented at the Institute for the History of Religions of Abo Akademii University, Turku, Finland [ApriI23, 1997]), http://www.geocities.comlWellesley/1114/cyberspa.html. accessed February 9 2005.
    • Brasher, B. (2004), Give Me That Online Religion (New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press).
    • Braziel, J.E. and Munnar, A. (eds.) (2003), Theorizing Diaspora (Oxford: Blackwell).
    • Brooks, C.R. (1989), The Hare Krishnas in India (Princeton: Princeton University Press).
    • Brown, D.M. (1958), The White Umbrella - Indian Political Thoughtfrom Manu to Gandhi (Berkeley: University of California Press).
    • Bruce, S. (1993), 'Religion and Rational Choice: A Critique of Economic Explanations of Religious Behaviour', Sociology of Religion, 54 (2), 193-205.
    • --- (1999), Choice and Religion (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
    • --- (2002), God Is Dead (Oxford: Blackwell).
    • Bryman, A. and Burgess, R.O. (1994), 'Reflections on Qualitative Data Analysis', in Bryman, A. and Burgess, R.O. (eds.), Analyzing Qualitative Data (London: Routledge), 216-226.
    • Brzezinski, (1998), 'What Was Srua Prabhupada's Position: The Hare Krsna Movement and Hinduism', ISKCON Communications Journal, 6 (2), 27-49.
    • Buckley, P. and Clark, D. (2004), The Rough Guide to the Internet (London: Rough Guides Ltd).
    • Bunt, G.R (2000a), 'Surfing Islam: Ayatollahs, Shayks and Hajjis on the Superhighway', in Hadden, lK. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion on the Internet: Research Prospects and Promises (New York: JAI), 127-51.
    • --- (2000b), Virtually Islamic - Computer-mediated Communication and Cyber Islamic Environments (Cardiff: University of Wales Press).
    • --- (2003), Islam in the Digital Age - E-Jihad, Online Fatwas and Cyber Islamic Environments (London: Pluto Press).
    • --- (2004), "'Rip. Burn. Pray." Islamic Expression Online', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith Online (New York: Routledge), 123-34.
    • Burgess, RG. et al. (1994), 'Four Studies From One or One Study From Four - Multisite Case Study Research', in Bryman, A. and Burgess, R.G. (eds.),Analyzing Qualitative Data (London: Routledge), 129-145.
    • Burghart, R. (ed.), (1987), Hinduism in Great Britain (London: Tavistock).
    • Campbell, C. (1999), 'The Eastemisation of the West', in Wilson, B. and Cresswell, J. (eds.), New Religious Movements - Challenge and Response (London: Routledge),35-48.
    • Campbell, H. (2004), "'This is my Church": Seeing the Internet and Club Culture as Spiritual Spaces', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 107-21.
    • Campbell, R.A. (2004), 'Searching for the Apocalypse in Cyberspace', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 239-53.
    • Camporesi (1988), The Incorruptible Flesh: Bodily Mutilation and Mortification in Religion and Folklore (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
    • Caputo, J.D. (2000), On Religion (London: Routledge).
    • Carey, S. (1983), 'The Hare Krishna Movement and Hindus in Britain', New Community, 10 (3),477-486.
    • --- (1987), 'The Indianization of the Hare Krishna Movement in Britain', in Burghart, R. (ed.), Hinduism in Great Britain (London: Tavistock), 81-99.
    • Carman, J.B. (1996), 'Handing Down and Reaching Across: Stability and Movement in Indian Religious Traditions', in Williams, R.B. (ed.),A Sacred ThreadModern Transmission of Hindu Traditions in India and Abroad (New York: Columbia University Press), 7-20.
    • Castaneda, C. (1968), The Teachings of Don Juan - A Yaqui Way of Knowledge (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of Cali fomi a Press).
    • Castells, M. (2000), The Rise of the Network Society (Oxford: Blackwell).
    • --- (2002), The Internet Galaxy - Reflections on the Internet, Business, and Society (New York: Oxford University Press).
    • Cenkner, W. (1996), 'The Sankaracarya of Kanchi and the Kamaksi Temple as Ritual Center', in Williams, R.B. (ed.), A Sacred Thread - Modern Transmission of Hindu Traditions in India and Abroad (New York: Columbia University Press), 52-67.
    • Chakrabarti, P. (1984), Social Profile ofTarakeswar - Study of a Pilgrim Town in West Bengal (Calcutta: Firma KLM).
    • Chaucer, G. [trans. Coghill, N.] (1951), The Canterbury Tales (London: Penguin).
    • Chaves, M. (1995), 'On the Rational Choice Approach to Religion', Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 34 (1), 98-104.
    • Choudhury, P.C.R. (1988), Temples and Legends of Bengal (Bombay: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan).
    • Clothey, F.W. (1996), 'Ritual and Reinterpretation: South Indians in Southeast Asia', in Williams, R.B. (ed.), A Sacred Thread - Modern Transmission of Hindu Traditions in Indian and A broad (New York: Columbia University Press), 127- 146.
    • Coakley, S. (1997a), 'Preface', in Coakley, S. (ed.), Religion and the Body (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), xv-xvii,
    • --- (1997b), 'Introduction: Religion and the Body', in Coakley, S. (ed.), Religion and the Body (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 1-12.
    • Collette, L. (1999), 'Cyberspace: The New Frontier for Religion', Cybersociology, 7, http://www.socio.demon.co.uk/magazinel7/lin.html, accessed October 18, 2004.
    • Collins, S. (1997), 'The Body in Theravada Buddhist Monasticism', in Coakley, S. (ed.), Religion and the Body (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 185- 204.
    • Couldry, N. (2004), 'The Digital Divide', in Gauntlett, D. and Horsley, R. (eds.), Web.Studies (London: Arnold), 185-194.
    • Cowan, D.E. (2004), 'Contested Spaces: Movement, Countermovement, and E-Space Propaganda', in Dawson, L.L and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion OnlineFinding Faith on the Internet (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 255-71.
    • --- (2005a), Cyberhenge: Modern Pagans on the Internet (New York and London: Routledge).
    • --- (2005b), 'Online U-Topia: Cyberspace and the Mythology of Placeless ness', Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 44 (3), 257-263.
    • Coward, H.G. (1985), Pluralism: Challenge to World Religions (Maryknoll, New York: Orbis).
    • --- (1989a), 'Introduction', in Coward, H.G .• Lipner, J.J. and Young. K.K. (eds.), Hindu Ethics - Purity, Abortion and Euthanasia (Albany: State University of New York), 1-7.
    • --- (1989b), 'Purity in Hinduism: With Particular Reference to Pataiijali's Yoga Siitras', in Coward, H.G., Lipner, J.J. and Young, K.K. (eds.), Hindu Ethics - Purity, Abortion and Euthanasia (Albany: State University of New York), 9-39.
    • Craib, I. (1992), Modern Social Theory - From Parsons to Habermas (Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf).
    • Cross, S. (1994), The Elements of Hinduism (Shaftesbury: Element Books Ltd.).
    • Cushman, A. and Jones, J. (1999), From Here to Nirvana - The Essential Guide to the Yogis and Gurus, Ashrams and Temples of Spiritual India (London: Rider).
    • Dash, J. (November 7, 2005), 'Denied Temple Entry, American Woman Gets Support', lANS, http://religion.info/englishlarticles/article 202.shtml, accessed November 27,2005.
    • Davis, E. (1995), 'Technopagans - May the Astral Plane be Reborn in Cyberspace', Wired,3 (7), http://www.wired.comlwirediarchive/3.07technopagans pr.html, accessed February 21, 2004.
    • --- (2004), TechGnosis: Myth, Magic and Mysticism in the Age 0/ Information (London: Serpent's Tail).
    • Dawson, L.L. (2000), 'Researching Religion in Cyberspace: Issues and Strategies', in Hadden, J.K and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion on the Internet: Research Prospects and Promises (New York: JAI), 25-54.
    • --- (2001a), 'Cyberspace and Religious Life: Conceptualizing the Concerns' (paper presented at CESNUR Conference, London), http://www.cesnur.org/2001Ilondon2001/dawson.htm. accessed October 10, 2004.
    • --- (2001b), 'Doing Religion in Cyberspace: The Promise and the Perils', The Council of Societies for the Study of Religion Bulletin, 30 (1),3-9, http://orts.uwaterloo.ca/soc/re1cybersssr.html, accessed February 21, 2004.
    • --- (2004a), 'Religion and the Quest for Virtual Community', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet (New York/London: Routledge), 75-89.
    • --- (2004b), Personal communication via Beckford, J.A.
    • --- (2005), 'The Mediation of Religious Experience in Cyberspace', in Hejsgaard, M.T. and Warburg, M. (eds.), Religion and Cyberspace (Abingdon: Routledge), 15- 37.
    • Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (2004), 'Introduction', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 1-16.
    • Dawson, L.L. and Hennebry, J. (2004), 'New Religions and the Internet: Recruiting in a New Public Space', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 151-73.
    • De Michelis, E. (2004), A History of Modern Yoga - Patafijali and Western Esotericism (London: Continuum).
    • Dodge, M. (2005), 'The Role of Maps in Virtual Research Methods', in Hine, C. (ed.), Virtual Methods - Issues in Social Research on the Internet (Oxford: Berg), 113-127.
    • Dodge, M. and Kitchin, R. (2001), Mapping Cyberspace (London: Routledge).
    • Doniger, W. (1997), 'Medical and Mythical Constructions of the Body in Hindu Texts', in Coakley, S. (ed.), Religion and the Body (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 167-84.
    • Dowson, J. (1992), A Classical Dictionary of Hindu Mythology and Religion, Geography, History and Literature (New Delhi: Heritage).
    • Dreyfus, H.L. (2001), On the Internet (London: Routledge).
    • Eck, D.L. (1985), Darsan - Seeing the Divine Image in India (Chambersburg: Anima Books).
    • --- (1993), Banaras: City of Light (New Delhi: Penguin Books).
    • Edwards, L. (2001), A Brief Guide to Beliefs - Ideas, Theologies, Mysteries, and Movements (Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press).
    • Eichinger Ferro-Luzzi, G. (1997), 'The Polythetic-prototype Approach to Hinduism', in Sontheimer, G.D. and Kulke, H. (eds.), Hinduism Reconsidered (New Delhi: Manohar), 294-304.
    • Eisenstein, Z. (1998), 'Global Obscenities: Patriarchy, Capitalism and the Lure of Cyberfantasy', in Beynon, J. and Dunkerley, D. (eds.) (2000), GlobalizationThe Reader (London: The Athlone Press), 212-13.
    • Escobar, A. (2000), 'Welcome to Cyberia - Notes on the Anthropology of Cyberspace', in Bell, D. and Kennedy, B.M. (eds.), The Cybercultures Reader (London: Routledge),56-76.
    • Ess, C. (March 30, 2005), 'Respondent's Comments' (paper given at The 19th World Congress of the International Association for the History of Religions, Tokyo).
    • Featherstone, M. (1991), 'The Body in Consumer Culture', in Featherstone, M., Hepworth, M. and Tumer, B.S. (eds.), The Body- Social Process and Cultural Theory (London: Sage), 170-196.
    • Featherstone, M. and Burrows, R. (eds.) (1995), Cyberspace/Cyberbodtes/Cyberpunk - Cultures of Technological Embodiment (London: Sage).
    • Featherstone, M., Hepworth, M. and Tumer, B.S. (eds.) (1991), The Body - Social Process and Cultural Theory (London: Sage).
    • Finke, R. (1997), 'The Consequence of Religious Competition - Supply-Side Explanations for Religious Change', in Young, L.A. (ed.), Rational Choice Theory and Religion - Summary and Assessment (New York/London: Routledge), 46-61.
    • Firth, S. (1991), 'Changing Patterns In Hindu Death Rituals', in Killingley, D., Menski, W. and Firth, S. (eds.), Hindu Ritual and Society (Newcastle Upon Tyne: Dermot Killingley), 52-83.
    • Fisher, D. (1992), 'Kristeva's Chora and the Subject ofPostmodern Ethics', in Crownfield, D. (ed.), Body and Text in Julia Kristeva: Religion, Women, and Psychoanalysis (Albany: State University of New York Press), 91-106.
    • Flood, G. (1995), 'Hinduism, Vaisnavism, and ISKCON: Authentic Traditions or Scholarly Constructions', ISKCON Communications Journal, 3 (2),5-15.
    • --- (1996),An Introduction to Hinduism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
    • Flory, R. (2005), Book Review: 'Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet', Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 44 (3), 364-365.
    • Forte, M.C. (2005), 'Centring the Links: Understanding Cybernetic Patterns of CoProduction, Circulation and Consumption', in Hine, C. (ed.), Virtual MethodsIssues in Social Research on the Internet (Oxford: Berg), 93-106.
    • Frykenberg, R. (1997), 'The Emergence of Modern "Hinduism" as a Concept and as an Institution: A Reappraisal with Special Reference to South India', in Sontheimer, G.D. and Kulke, H. (eds.), Hinduism Reconsidered (New Delhi: Manohar),82-107.
    • Fukamizu, K. (March 30, 2005), 'Internet Use by the Followers of Jodo Shinshu Buddhism' (paper given at the 19th World Congress of the International Association for the History of Religions, Tokyo).
    • Fuller, C.J. (1992), The Camphor Flame - Popular Hinduism and Society in India (Princeton: Princeton University Press).
    • Gauntlett, D. (2004a), 'Web Studies: What's New', in Gauntlett, D. and Horsley, R. (eds.), Web.Studies (London: Arnold), 3-23.
    • --- (2004b), 'Glossary', in Gauntlett, D. and Horsley, R. (eds.), Web.Studies (London: Arnold), 285-296.
    • Gauntlett, D. and Horsley, R. (eds.) (2004), Web. Studies (London: Arnold).
    • Giddens, A. (1990), The Consequences of Modernity (Cambridge: Polity).
    • --- (2002), Runaway World - How Globalisation is Reshaping Our Lives (London: Profile Press).
    • Gillham, B. (2000), The Research Interview (London: Continuum).
    • Green, N. (1997), 'Beyond Being Digital: Representation and Virtual Corporeality', in Holmes, D. (ed.), Virtual Politics: Identity and Community in Cyberspace (London: Sage), 59-78.
    • Griffin, W. (2004), 'The Goddess Net', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 189-203.
    • Guidry, J.A., Kennedy, M.D. and Zald, M.N. (2000), 'Globalizations and Social Movements', in Guidry, J.A., Kennedy, M.D. and Zald, M.N. (eds.), Globalizations and Social Movements (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press), 1-32.
    • Guimaraes Jr., MJ.L. (2005), 'Doing Anthropology in Cyberspace: Fieldwork Boundaries and Social Environments', in Hine, C. (ed.), Virtual MethodsIssues in Social Research on the Internet (Oxford: Berg), 141-156.
    • Gupta, S.S. (2002), Puri - Lord Jagannatha 's Dhaam (New Delhi: Rupa & Co.).
    • Gurak, L.J. (2004), 'Internet Studies in the Twenty-First Century', in Gauntlett, D. and Horsley, R. (eds.), Web.Studies (London: Arnold), 24-33.
    • Hadden, J.K and Cowan, D.E. (2000), 'The Promised Land or Electronic Chaos? Toward Understanding Religion on the Internet', in Hadden, J.K. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion on the Internet: Research Prospects and Promises (New York: JAI), 3-21.
    • HAF Press Release (March 10,2006), 'Hindu American Foundation Plans to File Suit Against California State Board of Education Over Textbook Adoption', http://www.hinduismtoday.comlhpil2006/3/1 0.shtml#2, accessed July 25, 2006.
    • Hamilton, M. (1993), The Sociology of Religion: Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives (Oxford: Blackwell).
    • --- (1998), SOCiology and the World's Religions (Basingstoke and London: MacMillan Press).
    • Harcourt, W. (2004), 'World Wide Women and the Web', in Gauntlett, D. and Horsley, R. (eds.), Web.Studies (London: Arnold), 243-253.
    • Hardey, M. (2002), 'Life Beyond the Screen: Embodiment and Identity through the Internet', The Sociological Review, 50 (4), 570-85.
    • Harding, E.U. (2004), Kali - The Black Goddess of Dakshineswar (New Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass ).
    • Hariharan, V. (1999), 'Is India on the Brink of a Digital Abyss?', Cybersociology, 7, http://www.cybersociology.com/. accessed Aprill7, 2005.
    • Hasselle-Newcombe, S. (2005), 'Spirituality and "Mystical Religion" in Contemporary Society: A Case Study of British Practitioners of the Iyengar Method of Yoga' , Journal of Contemporary Religion, 20 (3), 305-321.
    • Hechter, M. (1997), 'Religion and Rational Choice', in Young, L.A. (ed.), Rational Choice Theory and Religion - Summary and Assessment (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 147-157.
    • Helland, C. (2000), 'Online-Religion/Religion Online and Virtual Communitas', in Hadden, 1.K. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion on the Internet: Research Prospects and Promises (New York: JAI), 205-23.
    • --- (2002), 'Surfing for Salvation', Religion, 32, 293-302.
    • --- (2004), 'Popular Religion and the World Wide Web: A Match Made in (Cyber) Heaven', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 23-35.
    • Hellawell, S. (2001), Beyond Access - ICT and Social Inclusion (London: Fabian Society).
    • Herring, D. (2005), 'Virtual as Contextual- A Net News Theology', in Hejsgaard, M.T. and Warburg, M. (eds.), Religion and Cyberspace (Abingdon: Routledge), 149-165.
    • Hine, C. (2000), Virtual Ethnography (London: Sage).
    • --- (2005a), 'Virtual Methods and the Sociology of Cyber-Social-Scientific Knowledge', in Hine, C. (ed.), Virtual Methods -Issues in Social Research on the Internet (Oxford: Berg), 1-13.
    • --- (2005b), 'Research Relationships and Online Relationships: Introduction', in Hine, C. (ed.), Virtual Methods - Issues in Social Research on the Internet (Oxford: Berg), 17-20.
    • --- (2005c), 'Research Sites and Strategies: Introduction', in Hine, C. (ed.), Virtual Methods - Issues in Social Research on the Internet (Oxford: Berg), 109-112.
    • Hejsgaard, M.T. (2005), 'Cyber-religion - On the Cutting Edge Between the Virtual and the Real', in Hejsgaard, M.T. and Warburg, M. (eds.), Religion and Cyberspace (Abingdon: Routledge), 50-63.
    • Hejsgaard, M.T. and Warburg, M. (2005), 'Introduction', in Hejsgaard, M.T. and Warbug, M. (eds.), Religion and Cyberspace (Abingdon: Routledge), 1-11.
    • Hoover, S.M., Clark, L.S. and Rainie, L. (2004), 'Faith Online - 64% of Wired Americans Have Used the Internet for Spiritual or Religious Purposes', http://www.pewintemet.org/pdfsIPIP Faith Online 2004.pdf, accessed April 28,2004.
    • HPI Press Release (April I,2006), 'Hinduism Today Magazine Launches Free Digital Edition', http://www.hinduismtoday.com/hpi/2006/4/1.shtml. accessed April I, 2006.
    • HSC Statement (November 25, 2005), 'Hindu Student Council Supports Temple Entry for Non-Indian Hindus', http://www.hinduismtoday.comlhpi/2005/11126.shtml. accessed November 27,2005.
    • Hudson, D. (1996), 'Winning Souls for Shiva - Arumuga Navalar's Transmission of the Saiva Religion', in Williams, R.B. (ed.), A Sacred Thread - Modern Transmission of Hindu Traditions in India and Abroad (New York: Columbia University Press). 23-51.
    • Hutchinson, B. (1996), 'The Divine-Human Figure in the Transmission of Religious Tradition', in Williams, R.B. (ed.), A Sacred Thread - Modern Transmission of Hindu Traditions in India and Abroad (New York: Columbia University Press), 92-124.
    • Iannaccone, L.R. (1995), 'Voodoo Economics? Reviewing the Rational Choice Approach to Religion', Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 34 (1), 76- 89.
    • --- (1997), 'Framework for the Scientific Study of Religion', in Young, L.A. (ed.), Rational Choice Theory and Religion (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 26-45.
    • Introvigne, M. (2000), '''So Many Evil Things": Anti-Cult Terrorism via the Internet', in Hadden, J.K. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion on the Internet: Research Prospects and Promises (New York: JAI), 277-306.
    • --- (2005), 'A Symbolic Universe - Information Terrorism and New Religions in Cyberspace', in Hejsgaard, M.T. and Warburg, M. (eds.), Religion and Cyberspace (Abingdon: Routledge), 102-117.
    • Jackson, R. (1996), 'The Construction of "Hinduism" and its Impact on Religious Education in England and Wales', Panorama: International Journal of Comparative Religious Education and Values, 8 (1), 86-104.
    • Jaisinghani, B. (September 9, 2005), 'Prasad in Your Inbox', The Times of India, 10.
    • James, P. and Carkeek, F. (1997), 'This Abstract Body: From Embodied Symbolism to Techno-Disembodiment', in Holmes, D. (ed.), Virtual Politics: Identity and Community in Cyberspace (London: Sage), 107-24.
    • Jankowski, N.W. and van Selm, M. (2005), 'Epilogue: Methodological Concerns and Innovations in Internet Research' , in Hine, C. (ed.), Virtual Methods - Issues in Social Research on the Internet (Oxford: Berg), 199-207.
    • Jenkins, M. (ApriI28, 1998), 'Surfing the Net for Souls', Network+ (The Independent), 2-3.
    • Juergensmeyer (1996), 'A New International Religion: Radhasoami', in Williams, R.B. (ed.), A Sacred Thread: Modern Transmission of Hindu Traditions in India and Abroad (New York: Columbia University Press), 278-99.
    • Kanitkar, V.P. and Cole, O. (1995), Hinduism (London: Hodder and Stoughton).
    • Kapoor, G.V. (February 26, 2003), 'Om Click Om', rediffcom, http://www.rediff.com//netguide2003/feb/26god.htm. accessed January 28, 2005.
    • Karaflogka, A. (2002), 'Religious Discourse and Cyberspace', Religion, 32, 279-9l.
    • Karmakar, R. (April J, 2002), 'Indian Temple Revives "Human Sacrifice"', BBC News, http://www.wwrn.org/sparse.php?idd=4512&c=85, accessed Apri127, 2005.
    • Killingley, D. (1991), 'Varna and Caste in Hindu Apologetic', in Killingley, D., Menski, W. and Firth, S. (eds.), Hindu Ritual and Society (Newcastle Upon Tyne: Dermot Killingley), 7-31.
    • Kim, M-C. (2005), 'Online Buddhist Community - An Alternative Religious Organization in the Information Age', in Hejsgaard, M.T. and Warburg, M. (eds.), Religion and Cyberspace (Abingdon: Routledge), 138-148.
    • Kinney, J. (1995), 'Net Worth? Religion, Cyberspace and the Future', Futures, 27 (7), 763-76.
    • Kishore, B.R. (1995), Hinduism (New Delhi: Diamond Pocket Books).
    • Knott, K. (1986a), Hinduism in Leeds: A Study of Religious Practice in the Indian Hindu Community and in Hindu-Related Groups (Leeds: University of Leeds Department of Theology and Religious Studies).
    • --- (1986b), My Sweet Lord - The Hare Krishna Movement (Wellingborough: The Aquarian Press).
    • Konstan, J.A., et al. (2005), 'The Story of Subject Naught: A Cautionary but Optimistic Tale ofInternet Survey Research', Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 10 (2), http://jcmc.indiana.edulvoll 0/issue2lkonstan.html, accessed Apri117, 2005.
    • Krishnananda, S. (1994), A Short History of Religious and Philosophic Thought in India (Shivanandanagar: The Divine Life Society).
    • Krogh, M.C. and Pillifant, B.A. (2004), 'The House ofNetjer', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 205-19.
    • Kumar, S. (n.d.), 'Direct Deposit Devotions', India Abroad News Service, http://www.beliefnet.com/story/33/story 3375.html, accessed January 28, 2005.
    • Lahangir, S. (July 26, 2006), 'Orissa Dalits Break Age-old Taboo', IANS, http://www.dailyindia.com/show/45741.php/Orissa Dalits break age old tabo Q, accessed August 1, 2006.
    • Lal, A. (2002), Sri Ramana Maharshi - Sage of the People (New Delhi: Rupa & Co.).
    • Laney, M.J. (2005), 'Christian Web Usage - Motives and Desires', in Hejsgaard, M.T. and Warburg, M. (eds.), Religion and Cyberspace (Abingdon: Routledge), 166- 179.
    • Larson, E. (2004), 'Cyberfaith: How Americans Pursue Religion Online', in Dawson, L.L. and Cowan, D.E. (eds.), Religion Online - Finding Faith on the Internet
    • Melwani, L. (n.d.), 'The Story of Hinduism Today', http://www.hinduismtoday.com/about us.shtml, accessed November 16, 2005.
    • Menski, W. (1991), 'Change and Continuity in Hindu Marriage Rituals', in Killingley, D., Menski, W. and Firth, S. (eds.), Hindu Ritual in Society (Newcastle Upon Tyne: Dermot Killingley), 32-51.
    • Meredith, S., Hickman, C. and Le Rolland, L. (2005), The Usborne Internet-Linked Encyclopedia of World Religions (London: Usborne).
    • Michaelson, M. (1987), 'Domestic Hinduism in a Gujarati Trading Caste', in Burghart, R. (ed.), Hinduism in Great Britain (London: Tavistock), 32-49.
    • Midgley, M. (1997), 'The Soul's Successors: Philosophy and the Body', in Coakley, S. (ed.), Religion and the Body (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 53-68.
    • Millard, E. (April 15, 2005), 'Study: China Tops in Net Censorship', Tech News, http://wwm.org/parse.php?idd=9701&c=84, accessed Apri116, 2005.
    • Miller, D. and Slater, D. (2000), The Internet - An Ethnographic Approach (Oxford: Berg).
    • Mitra, A. (1997), 'Diasporic Web Sites: Ingroup and Outgroup Discourse', Critical Studies in Mass Communication, 14, 158-181.
    • --- (2000), 'Virtual Commonality - Looking for India on the Internet', in Bell, D. and Kennedy, B.M. (eds.), The Cybercultures Reader (London: Routledge), 676- 694.
    • Mitra, S. (ed.) (2002), Varanasi - City Guide (New Delhi: Eicher Goodearth Ltd.).
    • Morinis, E.A. (1984), Pilgrimage in the Hindu Tradition - A Case Study of West Bengal (Delhi: Oxford University Press).
    • Morton, K. (1966), 'Marriage Rules in Bengal', American Anthropologist, 68 (4), 951- 970, [synopsis:] http://www.publicanthropology.org/Archive/Aa1966.htm. accessed November 9, 2005.
    • Narayanan, V. (1996), 'Creating the South Indian "Hindu" Experience in the United States', in Williams, RB. (ed.), A Sacred Thread - Modern Transmission 0/ Hindu Traditions in India and A broad (New York: Princeton), 147-176.
    • Nathan, J. (November 15,2004), 'Hindu Cleric Held Over Murder of Rival', Times Online, http://www.timesonline.co.uk/newspaper, accessed November 17,2004.
    • Nayar, P.K. (2004), Virtual Worlds - Culture and Politics in the Age of Cyberspace (New Delhi: Sage).
    • Needleman, J. (1984), The New Religions (New York: Crossroad).
    • Neitz, M. and Mueser, P.R (1997), 'Economic Man and the Sociology of Religion', in Young, L.A. (ed.), Rational Choice Theory and Religion - Summary and Assessment (New YorkILondon: Routledge), 106-118.
    • Nesbitt, E. (1997), 'The Body in Sikh Tradition', in Coakley, S. (ed.), Religion and the Body (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), 289-305.
    • Norris, P. and Inglehart, R (2004), Sacred and Secular - Religion and Politics Worldwide (New York: Cambridge University Press).
    • Nye, M. (1996), 'Hare Krishna and Sanatan Dharm in Britain: The Campaign for Bhaktivedanta Manor" Journal of Contemporary Religion, 11 (1),37-56; ISKCON Communications Journal, 4 (1), 5-23.
    • --- (1997), 'ISKCON and Hindus in Britain: Some Thoughts on a Developing Relationship', ISKCON Communications Journal.S (2),5-13.
    • Obeyesekere, O. (1977), 'Social Change and the Deities: Rise of the Kataragama Cult in Modem Sri Lanka', Man, 12 (3/4), 377-396.
    • --- (1986), 'The Cult of Huniyan: A New Religious Movement in Sri Lanka', in Beckford, J.A. (ed.), New Religious Movements and Rapid Social Change (London: Sage), 197-219.
    • O'Leary, S.D. (ApriI4, 2002), 'Falun Gong and the Internet', USC Annenberg Online
  • No related research data.
  • Discovered through pilot similarity algorithms. Send us your feedback.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article