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Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: T

Classified by OpenAIRE into

arxiv: Astrophysics::Earth and Planetary Astrophysics, Physics::Space Physics
On-line vibration monitoring plays an important role in the fault diagnosis and prognosis of industrial belt drive systems. This paper presents a novel measurement technique based on electrostatic sensing to monitor the transverse vibration of power transmission belts in an on-line, continuous, and non-contact manner. The measurement system works on the principle that variations in the distance between a strip-shaped electrode and the naturally electrified dielectric belt give rise to a fluctuating current output. The response of the sensor to a belt moving both axially and transversely is numerically calculated through finite-element modeling. Based on the sensing characteristics of the sensor, the transverse velocity of the belt is characterized through the spectral analysis of the sensor signal. Experiments were conducted on a two-pulley belt drive system to verify the validity of the sensing technique. The belt vibration at different axial speeds was measured and analyzed. The results show that the belt vibrates at well-separated modal frequencies that increase with the axial speed. A closer distance between the electrode and the belt makes higher order vibration modes identifiable, but also leads to severer signal distortion that produces higher order harmonics in the signal.\ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud \ud On-line vibration monitoring plays an important role in the fault diagnosis and prognosis of industrial belt drive systems. This paper presents a novel measurement technique based on electrostatic sensing to monitor the transverse vibration of power transmission belts in an on-line, continuous, and non-contact manner. The measurement system works on the principle that variations in the distance between a strip-shaped electrode and the naturally electrified dielectric belt give rise to a fluctuating current output. The response of the sensor to a belt moving both axially and transversely is numerically calculated through finite-element modeling. Based on the sensing characteristics of the sensor, the transverse velocity of the belt is characterized through the spectral analysis of the sensor signal. Experiments were conducted on a two-pulley belt drive system to verify the validity of the sensing technique. The belt vibration at different axial speeds was measured and analyzed. The results show that the belt vibrates at well-separated modal frequencies that increase with the axial speed. A closer distance between the electrode and the belt makes higher order vibration modes identifiable, but also leads to severer signal distortion that produces higher order harmonics in the signal.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

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    • Lijuan Wang received the B.Eng. degree in computer science and technology from Qiqihar University, Qiqihar, China, in 2010, and the Ph.D. degree in measurement and automation from North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China, in 2015. She is currently involved in post-doctoral research in instrumentation and measurement with North China Electric Power University. Her current research interests include electrostatic sensing, flow measurement, and digital signal processing. Xiangchen Qian received the B.Eng. degree in automation from the Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin, China, in 2004, the M.Sc. degree in automatic meter and device from Tianjin University, Tianjin, in 2007, and the Ph.D. degree in electronics engineering from the University of Kent, Canterbury, U.K., in 2013. He is currently a Lecturer with the School of Control and Computer Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing, China. His current research interests include multiphase flow measurement techniques, development of instrumentation systems, and digital signal processing.
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