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Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: BF, HN, RA
The qualitative study presented in this paper explored the perspectives of service-users, family members and staff about the impact of travel issues on the lives of mental health in-patients and carers. This topic was chosen because it was prioritised by members of Xplore, a service-user and carer research group, and has received little research attention. Travel problems were a significant issue for many service-users and carers, bound-up with mental health issues and the recovery experience. Travel facilitation through the funding of taxis and the provision of guides was appreciated. A few service-users and carers positively valued distancing from their previous home environment. The meaning of travel issues could only be understood in the context of individuals’ wider lives and relationships. The significance of the findings is discussed in relation to the social model of disability.
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    • Zulian, G., Donisi, V., Secco, G., Pertile, R., Tansella, M., and Amaddeo, F. 2011.
    • How are caseload and service utilisation of psychiatric services influenced by distance? A geographical approach to the study of community-based mental health services. Social psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 46(9): 881-891.
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