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Publisher: Blackwell
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: BC
A competitor playing the Newcomb game is in a state of torment – she wants to be temperamentally a one-boxer to maximize her chances of the opaque box containing a large sum of money but, when it comes to choosing, she wants to have an unplanned temperament-change, and two-box to maximize her winnings. Similarly someone who wants to win a large sum of money in Greg Kavka's fiendish set-up is in a state of torment, trying to keep the intention to drink the toxin at the stipulated time and to fight off the intention not to drink it, while knowing full well that merely intending to drink it (not actually drinking it) is what wins the bet. This phenomenological similarity is rooted in a structural similarity which these two paradoxes share with the 'Surprise Examination'.
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