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Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal: Malaria Journal
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Arctic medicine. Tropical medicine, qu_470, DOAJ:Health Sciences, qu_550, RC31-1245, histopathology, Research, DOAJ:Internal medicine, Infectious and parasitic diseases, Plasmodium falciparum, R, Histopathology, Autopsy, cerebral malaria, molecular barcode, qu_26.5, Cerebral malaria, Molecular barcode, qx_135, Internal medicine, genotyping, Plasmodium falciparum, Medicine, wc_750, Genotyping, DOAJ:Medicine (General), autopsy, RC955-962, RC109-216

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: parasitic diseases

Abstract

Background

Cerebral malaria, a severe form of Plasmodium falciparum infection, is an important cause of mortality in sub-Saharan African children. A Taqman 24 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) molecular barcode assay was developed for use in laboratory parasites which estimates genotype number and identifies the predominant genotype.

Methods

The 24 SNP assay was used to determine predominant genotypes in blood and tissues from autopsy and clinical patients with cerebral malaria.

Results

Single genotypes were shared between the peripheral blood, the brain, and other tissues of cerebral malaria patients, while malaria-infected patients who died of non-malarial causes had mixed genetic signatures in tissues examined. Children with retinopathy-positive cerebral malaria had significantly less complex infections than those without retinopathy (OR = 3.7, 95% CI [1.51-9.10]).The complexity of infections significantly decreased over the malaria season in retinopathy-positive patients compared to retinopathy-negative patients.

Conclusions

Cerebral malaria patients harbour a single or small set of predominant parasites; patients with incidental parasitaemia sustain infections involving diverse genotypes. Limited diversity in the peripheral blood of cerebral malaria patients and correlation with tissues supports peripheral blood samples as appropriate for genome-wide association studies of parasite determinants of pathogenicity.

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Funded by projects

  • WT | Functional investigation of ...
  • NIH | Genetic Diversity of Plasmo...

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