LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: LB1101, LB1139, LB1028
Within the Young Children as Researchers (YCAR) study, two aims were to establish ways young children construct knowledge by basing their decisions on evidence and to promote social justice by revealing young children as agents who make decisions based on evidence. An argument is constructed suggesting that recognition of young children’s decision-making based on evidence as an element in their constructions of knowledge can empower children as social agents.\ud Designed according to the academy’s protocols, the YCar study was driven principally by a value orientation framed by emancipatory, participatory and inductive approaches. Plural paradigms, a ‘jigsaw methodology’ and multiple methods gave primacy to participants: 138 children aged 4-8 years in three English early childhood settings participated, joined by their practitioners, families and professional researchers. Whilst the study complied with BERA guidelines (2004), its ethical progress was secured by its value orientation. Participating academy members identified the basis of decisions on evidence as ‘important’ research behaviour. Subsequently, analysis and meta-analysis of data with participants revealed participating children aged 4-8 years as agents who based decisions on evidence according to certain factors and adopted this behaviour for constructing and applying knowledge. The study indicates that ways in which participating young children construct knowledge by basing decisions on evidence carry important messages for practitioners, policymakers and the academy.\ud

Share - Bookmark

Download from

Cite this article