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mesheuropmc: nutritional and metabolic diseases, congenital, hereditary, and neonatal diseases and abnormalities, nervous system diseases, digestive, oral, and skin physiology
Background\ud \ud Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a complex genetic syndrome associated with hyperphagia and behavioural problems. Recent research suggested a link between hyperphagia and behavioural and emotional problems in PWS such as anger and anxiety. The current study aimed to explore this relationship further. \ud \ud Method\ud \ud Through parental report postal questionnaires, data was collected on the age, gender, weight, hyperphagia and behavioural and emotional problems of 105 children with PWS aged 4-18 years (M: 9.63 years). \ud \ud Results \ud \ud Following preliminary analysis, a series of multiple regressions were performed. Hyperphagic drive significantly predicted antisocial/disruptive behaviour, anxiety, social relating problems, communication disturbances and self-absorbed behaviours. Whilst hyperphagic behaviour did not significantly predict any behavioural/emotional problems. \ud \ud Conclusions\ud \ud This study reinforces research which has suggested an association between hyperphagia and non-food related behaviour in PWS. This has implications for the understanding of PWS and the development of psychological interventions for behavioural and emotional problems.
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    • Appendix 5.0: International cut off points for body mass index for overweight and obesity by gender, taken from Cole, Bellizzi, Flegal, & Dietz (2000) p. 4
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