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Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: BF
Among adults, women are more likely than men to perceive themselves as too heavy for their height, the gender discrepancy being greatest among those within a "normal" weight range. This finding has been explained in terms of the equation of female beauty with extreme thinness. As the physical changes of puberty are differentiated by gender, with males experiencing increased skeletal and muscle mass but females a gain in fat, this life stage has been seen as key for the development of female body dissatisfaction and associated problems such as lowered self esteem and eating disorders. In this analysis we compare changes in worries about putting on weight and dieting with actual body mass index at ages 11, 13, and 15.
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