LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Iosifidis, P. (2012)
Publisher: Open Society Foundations
Languages: English
Types: Book
Subjects: HM
Discussion of digital television has focused on switch-over dates, set-top boxes and the technical and economic implications of switch-over. This paper, by contrast, focusses on public interest obligations and citizenship values such as freedom, access, universality, political pluralism and content diversity.\ud \ud Petros Iosifidis distinguishes broadly between public interest priorities as understood in western Europe, and in central and eastern Europe. After assessing some obvious benefits of digital TV (extra channels, converged communications, enhanced interactivity and mobility), he argues that the public interest outcomes from the introduction of new technologies like the internet and digital TV will depend on how people use them, for new technology is only a vehicle by means of which public interest goals can be achieved.\ud \ud He then considers digital TV penetration data from across Europe, as well as the status of national digital switch-over plans, stressing that northern Europe is much more advanced in this regard than southern and eastern-central Europe.\ud \ud Outlining the pros and cons of digital switch-over for the public, Dr Iosifidis contends that universality and accessibility can best be ensured by maintaining public service media, which have been—and should continue to be—important conveyors of freely accessible and reliable information. Countries where television has been dominated by state broadcasters should use the new technology and in particular digital switch-over to create independent non-profit channels at both local and national levels, to foster a competitive environment and political pluralism.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 2. D. McQuail, Media Performance: Mass Communication and the Public Interest, Sage, London, 1992, p. 3.
    • 3. P. Iosifidis, Global Media and Communication Policy, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, UK, 2011a, pp. 45-92.
    • 4. Th e 2009 Telecoms Reforms Package, updating the EU Telecoms Rules of 2002, aims at bringing more competition to Europe's telecoms mar-
    • R.W. McChesney, (1998) “Making Media Democratic,” Boston Review, at: http://bostonreview.net/BR23.3/mcchesney.html.
    • 6. “Media and Democracy in Central and Eastern Europe (MDCEE),” An ERC Project based at the Department of Politics and International Relations of the University of Oxford in collaboration with the Department of Media and Communications, Th e London School of Economics and Political Science University of Oxford. Launched in October 2009. Details available at: http://mde.politics.ox.ac.uk/index.php/countryreports.
    • 7. K. Jakubowicz, “Ideas in Our Heads: Introduction of PSB as Part of Media System Change in Central and Eastern Europe,” European Journal of Communication 19(1) (2004), p. 54.
    • 10. J. Harrison and B. Wessels, “A New Public Service Communication Environment? Public Service Broadcasting Values in the Reconfiguring Media,” New Media & Society 7(6) (2005), pp. 834-853; K. Jakubowicz, “'PSB 3.0': Reinventing European PSB,” in P. Iosifidis (ed.), Reinventing Public Service Communication: European Broadcasters and Beyond , Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, UK, 2010, pp. 9-23.
    • 12. P. Iosifidis, “Digital Switchover in Europe,” International Communication Gazette 68(3) (2006), p. 266.
    • 13. K. Jakubowicz, “Digital Switchover in Central and Eastern Europe: Premature or Badly Needed?” Javnost/Th e Public 14(1) (2007a), p. 21.
    • 14. P. Iosifidis, “Growing Pains? Th e Transition to Digital Television in Europe,” European Journal of Communication 26(1) (2011b), pp. 6-7.
    • 15. M. Cave and C. Cowie, “Not Only Conditional Access: Towards a Better Regulatory Approach to Digital TV,” Communications & Strategies 30 (3rd Quarter) (1998), pp. 77-130. And see MDM Reference Paper 8, Gatekeeping in the Digital Age, by Peter Olaf Looms, at http://www.soros. org/initiatives/media/articles_publications/publications/mapping-digital-media-gatekeeping-digital-media-20110815.
    • 16. According to Neelie Kroes, Commissioner for the Digital Agenda, “digital citizenship” entails such diverse issues as access to online public services, the need for skilled workers, and the protection of citizens' rights online. See http://europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAction. do?reference=SPEECH/10/87.
    • 17. T.H. Marshall and T. Bottomore, Citizenship and Social Class, Pluto Press, London, 1987, cited in E. Varney, “Regulating the Digital Television Infrastructure in the EU. Room for Citizenship Interests?,” SCRIPT-ed 3(3), 2006, pp. 222-242, at: http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/script-ed/ vol3-3/varney.asp#sdendnote12anc.
    • 18. E. Varney, “Regulating the Digital Television Infrastructure in the EU. Room for Citizenship Interests?,” SCRIPT-ed 3(3), 2006, pp. 222-242, at http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/script-ed/vol3-3/varney.asp#sdendnote12anc.
    • 19. See also S. Livingstone, P. Lunt and L. Miller, “Citizens and Consumers: Discursive Debates During and After the Communications Act 2003,” Media, Culture & Society 29(4) (2007), pp. 616-618.
    • 20. D. Tambini and J. Cowling (2004) (eds), From Public Service Broadcasting to Public Service Communications, Institute for Public Policy Research, London, 2004; G.F. Lowe and J. Bardoel, “From Public Service Broadcasting to Public Service Media: Th e Core Challenge,” in G.F. Lowe and J. Bardoel (eds) From Public Service Broadcasting to Public Service Media, RIPE@2007, NORDICOM, Göteborg, 2007, pp. 9-28; P. Iosifidis (ed.), Reinventing Public Service Communication: European Broadcasters and Beyond, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, UK, 2010.
    • 21. M. Lengyel, “From 'State Broadcasting' to 'Public Service Media' in Hungary,” in P. Iosifidis (ed.), Reinventing Public Service Communication: European Broadcasters and Beyond, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, UK, 2010, p. 250.
    • 22. P. Stępka, “Public Service Broadcasting in Poland: Between Politics and Market,” in P. Iosifidis (ed.), Reinventing Public Service Communication: European Broadcasters and Beyond, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, UK, 2010. p. 234.
    • 23 Th e term “telemedia”-which bridges “tele services” such as telecommunications and “media services” such as television-entered German federal law with the 2007 Telemedia Act (Telemediengesetz), available in German at http://bundesrecht.juris.de/tmg/index.html
    • 24 K. Jakubowicz, “'PSB 3.0': Reinventing European PSB,” in P. Iosifidis (ed.), Reinventing Public Service Communication: European Broadcasters and Beyond, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, UK, 2010, pp. 21-22.
    • Castells, M. “Communication, Power and Counter-power in the Network Society,” International Journal of Communication 1 (2007), pp. 238-266.
    • Cave, M. and C. Cowie. “Not Only Conditional Access: Towards a Better Regulatory Approach to Digital TV,” Communications & Strategies 30 (3rd Quarter) (1998), pp. 77-130.
    • European Commission. “Communication from the Commission on the application of State aid rules to public service broadcasting.” Brussels: EU, 2009. Available at http://ec.europa.eu/competition/state_aid/ legislation/specific_rules.html#broadcasting
    • Feintuck, M. and M. Varney. Media Regulation, Public Interest and the Law. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006.
    • Harrison, J. and B. Wessels. “A New Public Service Communication Environment? Public Service Broadcasting Values in the Reconfiguring Media,” New Media & Society 7(6) (2005), pp. 834-853.
    • Iosifidis, P. “Digital Switchover in Europe,” International Communication Gazette 68(3) (2006), pp. 249-267.
    • Iosifidis, P. (ed.) Reinventing Public Service Communication: European Broadcasters and Beyond. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
    • Iosifidis, P. Global Media and Communication Policy Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011a.
    • Iosifidis, P. “Growing Pains? Th e Transition to Digital Television in Europe,” European Journal of Communication 26(1) (2011b), pp. 3-17.
    • Jakubowicz, K. “Ideas in Our Heads: Introduction of PSB as Part of Media System Change in Central and Eastern Europe,” European Journal of Communication 19(1) (2004), pp. 53-74.
    • Jakubowicz, K. “Digital Switchover in Central and Eastern Europe: Premature or Badly Needed?,” Javnost/ hT e Public 14(1) (2007a), pp. 21-38.
    • Jakubowicz, K. “Th e Eastern European/Post Communist Media Model Countries: Introduction,” in G. Terzis (ed.), European Media Governance: National and Regional Dimensions, pp. 303-313. Bristol, UK: Intellect, 2007b.
    • Livingstone, S., P. Lunt and L. Miller. “Citizens and Consumers: Discursive Debates During and After the Communications Act 2003”, Media, Culture & Society 29(4) (2007), pp. 613-638.
    • Lowe, G.F. and J. Bardoel. “From Public Service Broadcasting to Public Service Media: Th e Core Challenge,” in G.F. Lowe and J. Bardoel (eds) From Public Service Broadcasting to Public Service Media. RIPE@2007, pp. 9-28. Göteborg, Sweden: NORDICOM, 2007.
    • McChesney, R.W. “Making Media Democratic,” Boston Review, 1998. Available at http://bostonreview.net/ BR23.3/mcchesney.html
    • McQuail, D. Media Performance: Mass Communication and the Public Interest. London: Sage, 1992.
    • Marshall, T.H. and T. Bottomore. Citizenship and Social Class. London: Pluto Press, 1987.
    • Stępka, P. “Public Service Broadcasting in Poland: Between Politics and Market,” in P. Iosifidis (ed.), Reinventing Public Service Communication: European Broadcasters and Beyond, pp. 233-244. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
    • Tambini, D. and J. Cowling (eds) From Public Service Broadcasting to Public Service Communications. London: Institute for Public Policy Research, 2004.
    • Varney, E. “Regulating the Digital Television Infrastructure in the EU. Room for Citizenship Interests?,” SCRIPT-ed 3(3) (2006), pp. 222-242. Available at http://www.law.ed.ac.uk/ahrc/script-ed/vol3-3/ varney.asp#sdendnote12anc
    • 1. Online Media and Defamation-Toby Mendel
    • 2. Digital Media and Investigative Reporting-Mark Lee Hunter
    • 3. Mobile TV: Challenges and Opportunities Beyond 2011-Ronan de Renesse
    • 4. Citizen Journalism and the Internet-Nadine Jurrat
    • 5. Digitization and Media Business Models-Robert Picard
    • 6. Freedom of Expression Rights in the Digital Age-Andrew Puddephatt
    • 7. Net Neutrality and the Media-Stefaan Verhulst
    • 8. Gatekeeping in the Digital Age-Peter Looms
    • 9. Technical Standards in Terrestrial Television-David Wood
    • 10. The Digital Dividend-Gérard Pogorel
    • 11. How Television Went Digital in the Netherlands-Nico van Eijk and Bart van der Sloot
    • 12. The Media and Liability for Content on the Internet-Cynthia Wong and James X. Dempsey
    • 13. Case Study: German Public Service Broadcasting and Online Activity-Johannes Weberling
    • 14. Online Advertising: Origins, Evolution, and Impact on Privacy-Fernando Bermejo
    • 15. Social Media and News-Paul Bradshaw
    • 16. Digital Media, Conflict and Diasporas in the Horn of Africa-Iginio Gagliardone and Nicole Stremlau
  • No related research data.
  • Discovered through pilot similarity algorithms. Send us your feedback.

Share - Bookmark

Download from

Cite this article