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Publisher: University of Glasgow: Glasgow
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Converging, albeit inconsistent, empirical evidence\ud suggests that the morphological structure of a word\ud influences its pronunciation. We investigated this\ud issue using Ultrasound Tongue Imaging in the\ud context of an experimental cognitive psychology\ud paradigm. Scottish speakers were trained on\ud apparently homophonous monomorphemic and\ud bimorphemic novel words (e.g. zord, zorred), and\ud tested on speech production tasks. Monomorphemic\ud items were realised acoustically with shorter\ud durations than bimorphemic items; however, this\ud difference was not statistically significant.\ud Progressive coarticulatory effects were also\ud observed in the monomorphemic condition for some\ud speakers. A dynamic analysis of the articulatory data\ud revealed that the observed differences in the\ud pronunciations of the two types of items could be\ud due to factors other than morphological structure.\ud Our results, albeit inconclusive, make a significant\ud contribution to the literature in this research domain\ud insofar as the presence or absence of morphological\ud effects on pronunciation has important implications\ud for extant theories of speech production.

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