LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Butchart, Maggie; Long, Joseph J.; Brown, Michael; McMillan, Anne; Bain, Janice; Karatzias, Thanos (2017)
Publisher: Springer Nature
Journal: Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: BF Psychology, Wellbeing, 616.8 Nervous & mental disorders, Visual impairment, Sight loss, Autism, ASD,

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: genetic structures, mental disorders, eye diseases
PurposeThis review presents the evidence on the prevalence of visual impairments in children and adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and the similar behavioural traits associated with both visual impairment and autism.MethodA systematic literature review was conducted using online databases.ResultsSeven studies explored the incidence of visual impairments in people with ASD and found a higher incidence of strabismus (squint) (8.3%) than in a comparable child population (1.5 to 5.3%). Eleven studies identified behavioural traits common to both autistic and visually impaired populations. The majority were small-scale screening studies using varied methodologies, constituting an emerging field of research.ConclusionFurther large-scale, multicentre studies are required to accurately identify prevalence rates of ophthalmic conditions in people with ASD. There is a small but evolving evidence base that establishes behavioural and linguistic traits common to both visual impairment and autism.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article