LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Publisher: IOS Press
Languages: English
Types: Part of book or chapter of book
Subjects:
Digital technologies are being used as part of international efforts to revolutionize healthcare in order to meet increasing demands such as the rising burden of chronic disease and ageing populations. In Scotland there is a government push towards a national service (Living It Up) as a single point of reference where citizens can access information, products and services to support their health and wellbeing. The aim of the study is to examine implementation issues including the challenges or facilitators which can help to sustain this intervention. We gathered data in three ways: a) participant observation to gain an understanding of LiU (N=16); b) in-depth interviews (N=21) with stakeholders involved in the process; and c) analysis of documentary evidence about the progress of the implementation (N=45). Barriers included the need to “work at risk” due to delays in financing, inadequate infrastructure and skill-set deficiencies, whilst facilitators included trusted relationships, champions and a push towards normalisation. The findings suggest that a Scottish ehealth service is achievable but identifies key considerations for future large scale initiatives.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • [1] World Health Organisation. WHO | 10 facts on ageing and the life course [Internet]. 2014 [cited 08 November 2014]. Available from: http://www.who.int/features/factfiles/ageing/en/
    • [2] World Health Organisation. WHO | Noncommunicable diseases [Internet]. 2014 [cited 11November 2014]. Available from: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs355/en/
    • [3] Scotland.gov.uk. Long Term Conditions [Internet]. 2014 [cited 11 November 2014]. Available from: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Health/Services/LongTerm-Conditions
    • [4] Barnett K, Mercer SW, Norbury M, Watt G, Wyke S, Guthrie B. Epidemiology of multimorbidity and implications for health care, research, and medical education: a cross-sectional study. Lancet. 2012 Jul 7;380(9836):37-43
    • [5] Transforming primary care in London. NHS England (London Region)/Primary Care Transformation Programme. 2013.
    • [6] Digital Participation A National Framework for Local Action [Internet]. Scottish Government; 2014 [cited 15 November 2014]. Available from: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/0044/00448804.pdf
    • [7] Morrison D, Mair F. Telehealth in practice: using Normalisation Process Theory to bridge the translational gap. Primary Care Respiratory Journal. 2011;20(4):351.
    • [8] Lehnbom EC, McLachlan AJ, Brien JA. A qualitative study of Swedes' opinions about shared electronic health records. Stud Health Technol Inform. 2013;192:3-7
    • [9] May C, Finch T. Implementation, embedding, and integration: an outline of normalization process theory. Sociology 2009;43:535-54
    • [10] Ritchie J, Lewis J. Qualitative Research Practice: A Guide for Social Science Students and Researchers. London, england: Sage Publications; 2014.
    • [11] McEvoy, Ballini L, Maltoni S, O'Donnell CA, Mair FS, MacFarlane A. A qualitative systematic review of studies using the Normalisation Process Theory to research implementation processes. Implementation Science 2013, 9 (2).
    • [12]McGee-Lennon, M.; Bouamrane, M-M.; Barry, S., Grieve, E.; Latina, D.;Watson, N.;O'Donnell, K.; Wyke, S.; Brewster, S.; Briggs, A.; Finch, T.; Mair, F. Evaluating the Delivery of Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale (dallas). Proceedings of HCI 2012 - People & Computers XXVI, The 26th BCS Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Birmingham, UK, Sept. 2012
    • [13] Living It Up Progress Report [Internet]. NHS 24; 2014 [cited 5 December 2014]. Available from: http://www.nhs24.com/aboutus/nhs24board/agendasandpa pers/2014/april/
    • [14] Ling T, Brereton L, Conklin A, Newbould J, Roland M. Barriers and facilitators to integrating care: experiences from the English Integrated Care Pilots. International Journal of Integrated Care 2012;12:e129.
    • [15] Wade VA, Eliott, JA and Hiller JE. Clinician acceptance is the key factor for sustainable telehealth services. Qualitative Health Research 2014; 5: 682-694
    • [16] Mair, F., May, C., O'Donnell, C., Finch, T., Sullivan, F., Murray, E. (2012). Factors that promote or inhibit the implementation of e-health systems: An explanatory systematic review. Bulletin World Health Organisation,90(5), 357-364.
    • [17] Goroll AH, Simon SR, Tripathi M, et al. Communitywide implementation of health information technology: the Massachusetts eHealth Collaborative experience. J Am Med Inform Assoc 2009 Jan-Feb;16(1):132-9.
    • Ruth Agbakoba, 124 Observatory Road, G12 9LX, Scotland, U.K.
    • Email:
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Download from

Cite this article