LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Broun, Dauvit (2015)
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Discussions of medieval statehood are guided (explicitly or implicitly) by the work of social scientists. The exiguous sources for studying Scotland in the central middle ages offers an opportunity to approach the question of statehood in a new way that depends more on the creative potential of arts and humanities. Social sciences remain crucial for understanding statehood. Instead of being guided by them during the research, however, the medieval material can itself become the basis for a dialogue with formulations of statehood by social scientists, or by historians drawing on social science. The focus is on ‘Scotland’ (the country between the Forth and the Spey), examining the basis of secular authority in local lordship, and how this underpinned the mobilisation of society for the sake of safeguarding its peace and security. This includes a consideration of the power of lordly kindreds, the lands assigned to the offices of mormaer and king, and the changing relationship of lords to individual settlements, and how this could underlie the transition from pett to baile in place names c.1100. As a result, a fresh view is taken on the antecedents of earldoms and the nature of shires, and on the role of the mormaer.
  • No references.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article