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Jones, Alison (2010)
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects:
Female genital mutilation (FGM) or female circumcision is the term given to traditional practices involving the intentional cutting or partial or total removal of the external female genitalia (WHO, 1999). This two part study used both qualitative and quantitative methods. The first part of the study aimed to explore the views and experiences of FGM amongst women who had undergone the practice. It also explored their views about what clinical psychologists needed to know and do in order to provide appropriate services. In this part of the study six participants were interviewed using a semi-structured interview. The data was analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Findings indicated that participants felt that despite there being many reasons given for FGM none of them justified the continuation of the practice. Further findings suggested that participants felt that clinical psychologists needed to; understand how FGM is accounted for (e.g. reasons and contexts); acknowledge the different views towards the practice; have knowledge of the many consequences of the procedure (e.g. on physical health, psychological health and relationships) and talk about FGM in a sensitive and non-judgemental manner during consultations.\ud Part two of the study explored the experiences, knowledge and training needs related to FGM amongst qualified clinical psychologists. A survey was completed by 74 clinical psychologists working in a range of specialities. The findings indicated that there was minimal experience of working with FGM related difficulties amongst participants. Knowledge about FGM and the consequences of it were also limited. Furthermore, clinical psychologists had received little training about FGM and many did not feel confident in working with issues related to the practice. Implications for clinical practice and recommendations for further research are suggested including; training opportunities specifically regarding FGM and further research that explores the connections between the physical and psychological consequences of the practice.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 4.2. PART TWO: DISCUSSION
    • 4.2.1. Experience of working with FGM amongst clinical
    • 4.2.2. Knowledge of FGM amongst clinical psychologists
    • 4.2.3. Confidence and training needs amongst clinical
    • 4.3. GENERAL DISCUSSION
    • 4.3.1. Part One: Summary of Findings
    • 4.3.2. Part Two: Summary of Findings
    • 4.3.3. General Findings: Overlap between Part One and Two
    • 4.3.3.1. Accounting for FGM
    • 4.3.3.2. Impact of FGM
    • 4.3.3.3. Talking about FGM
    • 4.4. Evaluating the Research
    • 4.4.1. Contributing in Advancing Wider Knowledge
    • 4.4.2. Defensible in Design
    • 4.4.3. Rigorous in Conduct
    • 4.4.4. Credible in Claim 4.5 IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE 4.6. IMPLICATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH 4.7. CRITICAL REVIEW
    • 4.7.1. Participants
    • 4.7.2. Part One: Interview Schedule
    • 4.7.3. Part Two: Survey
    • 4.7.4. My Position
    • 4.7.5. My Perspective REFERENCES APPENDICES Kontoyannis, M. & Katsetos, C. (2010). Female Genital Mutilation. Health Science Journal. 4 (1). 31-36.
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

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