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Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: mem_text_and_place
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 1. I would like to thank Shaun McDaid, Sean Farrell, Margaret Mills Harper and David Coughlan for their generous help and advice during the writing of this article.
    • 2. Glenn Patterson 'Butcher's Tools', Fortnight (September 1994), p.43.
    • 3. Robert McLiam Wilson, 'Rhythm Method' Fortnight (September 1994), p.31.
    • 4. Robert McLiam Wilson, 'Rhythm Method', p. 31.
    • 5. Maurice Leitch, Interview, Banned in Ireland (London, Routledge, 1990), p. 100.
    • 6. Maurice Leitch, Interview, Banned in Ireland (London, Routledge, 1990) pps.97-108, p.108.
    • 7. Maurice Leitch, Banned in Ireland, p.100.
    • 8. Maurice Leitch, Banned in Ireland, pps. 99-100.
    • 9. John Wilson Foster, Forces and Themes in Ulster Fiction, (Dublin: Gill and Macmillan, 1974), p.268.
    • 10. Michael Parker reads The Liberty Lad, productively, against the backdrop of the failure of Liberal O'Neillism in the 60s and offers the novel as a critique of Unionist intransigence in Northern Irish Literature 1975-2006: The Imprint of History (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 2007).
    • 11. There is a growing body of criticism on Unionist communities in the pre-Troubles period: Gillian McIntosh's The Force of Culture: Unionist identities in Twentieth-Century Ireland (Cork: Cork University Press (1999) deals well with the use of literature in the construction of a regional Ulster identity. Jane McCaughey's Ulster's Men: Protestant Unionist Masculinities and Militarization in the North of Ireland (Kingston: McGillQueen's University, 2012) offers vital context for an understanding of the development of Unionist men's identity in the twentieth century.
    • 12. See Barry Sloan, Writers and Protestantism in the North of Ireland (Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 2000) and Barry Sloan, 'The Remains of Protestantism in Maurice Leitch's Fiction', Irish Fiction since the 1960s, Edited by Elmer Kennedy-Andrews (Gerrards Cross: Colin Smythe, 2006), pps.247-262.
    • 13. Barry Sloan, 'The Remains of Protestantism', p.260.
    • 14. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.111.
    • 15. Neil Jarman, 'Intersecting Belfast', Landscape, Politics and Perspectives, (Oxford, Berg, 1993), p.134.
    • 16. Seamus Heaney, 'Act of Union', North (London: Faber and Faber, 1975), p.49.
    • 17. Jonathan Allison argues this point in 'Patrick Kavanagh and the Anti-Pastoral' in The Cambridge Companion to Contemporary Irish Poetry (Ed. Matthew Campbell, Cambridge: CUP, 2003).
    • 18. George O'Brien, 'Contemporary Prose in English: 1940-2000', The Cambridge History of Irish Literature, (Cambridge, Cambridge UP, 2006), pp.438-9.
    • 19. Frank Glass is also the name of the protagonist in The Liberty Lad, and the chronology would place him as teenage during Stamping Ground's 1950's setting. Glass becomes the victim of sexual harassment from a married man in order to get a promotion.
    • 20. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.4.
    • 21. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.6.
    • 22. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.11.
    • 23. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.14.
    • 24. Paul Bew, Peter Gibbon, Henry Patterson , Northern Ireland 1921-2001 (London: Serif, 2001), p.106.
    • 25. Reprinted as Laura Mulvey, 'Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema', Visual and Other Pleasures (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1989), pps.14-28, p.20.
    • 26. Laura Mulvey, 'Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema', p.21-22.
    • 27. Jacques Derrida, Archive Fever (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996), pp.1-3.
    • 28. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.30.
    • 29. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.30.
    • 30. John Wilson Foster, Forces and Themes, p.254.
    • 31. John Wilson Foster, Forces and Themes, p.255.
    • 32. The complicity of the Catholic Church in the abuse of children and the persecution of unmarried mothers is well detailed in Diarmuid Feritter's Occasions of Sin: Sex and Society in Modern Ireland (London: Profile Books, 2009).
    • 33. Longley, The Living Stream, p.187.
    • 34. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.41.
    • 35. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.198.
    • 36. Ferriter, p.227.
    • 37. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.35.
    • 38. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.31.
    • 39. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.94.
    • 40. Julia Kristeva, Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection (New York: Columbia, 1984), p.71.
    • 41. Julia Kristeva, Powers of Horror, p.71.
    • 42. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.31.
    • 43. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.32
    • 44. Hetty also has fantasies about her body which revolve around being captured by the Gestapo and of having medical conditions. She fantasises about getting on a bus to the city to be met by a handsome man in a white car who would buy her perfume, shoes, jewellery and 'a little fluffy dog like the one Gloria Grahame had in that picture she had once seen', Stamping Ground, p.19.
    • 45. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.183.
    • 46. Barry Sloan, 'The Remains of Protestantism', p.248
    • 47. See, in particular, Steve Neale's 'Masculinity as Spectacle', Screen 24, 6 (1983), Carol J. Clover's Men, Women and Chainsaws (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1992), and Kaja Silverman's Male Subjectivity at the Margins (New York: Routledge, 1992).
    • 48. Laura Mulvey, 'Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema', p.14.
    • 49. Laura Mulvey, 'Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema', p.18.
    • 50. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.21.
    • 51. Jacques Derrida, 'From Memoirs of the Blind', The Derrida Reader: Writing Performances, Ed. Julian Wolfreys (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1998), p.172
    • 52. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.20.
    • 53. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.89.
    • 54. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.27.
    • 55. Karen Jacobs, The Eye's Mind: Literary Modernism and Visual Culture (New York: Cornell University Press, 2001), pps.1-2
    • 56. Laura Mulvey, 'Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema', p.21-22.
    • 57. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.99.
    • 58. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.101.
    • 59. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.158.
    • 60. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.121.
    • 61. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.109.
    • 62. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.116.
    • 63. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.119.
    • 64. Laura Mulvey, 'Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema', p.15.
    • 65. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.129.
    • 66. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.131.
    • 67. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.131.
    • 68. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.195.
    • 69. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.199.
    • 70. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.197.
    • 71. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.199.
    • 72. John Berger, 'Ways of Seeing', The Feminism and Visual Culture Reader, Ed. Amelia Jones (New York, Routledge, 2003), p.39.
    • 73. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.200.
    • 74. Seamus Heaney, 'Act of Union', p.49.
    • 75. Clair Wills, Improprieties: Politics and Sexuality in Northern Irish Poetry (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1993), p.69.
    • 76. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.202.
    • 77. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.203.
    • 78. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.201.
    • 79. Alison Young, The Scene of Violence: Crime, Cinema, Affect, (New York, Routledge, 2010), p.34.
    • 80. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.206.
    • 81. Maurice Leitch, Stamping Ground, p.209.
    • 82. While John McGahern's Amongst Women (London: Faber, 1990) is his most sustained critique of the patriarchal agency in of the Irish state, the theme resonates through his oeuvre. A compelling analysis of this is Antoinette Quinn's 'A Prayer for My Daughters: Patriarchy in “Amongst Women” The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies 17.1 (1991) 79-90.
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