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Publisher: MA Healthcare Ltd.
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: RT

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: health care economics and organizations, education
Against a background of increased public concern about domestic abuse, and data showing a high prevalence of domestic violence against both men and women, this literature review examines the willingness of clients to disclose that they are victims of domestic abuse to health visitors and other health professionals. The review seeks to establish what factors are significant in encouraging clients to disclose domestic abuse or deterring them from doing so. It also aims to explore the health visitor's professional role in this area. While legislation such as the Human Rights Act (1998) and the Crime and Disorder Act (1998) place obligations on health visitors to respond proactively to signs of domestic violence, they may face practical difficulties in doing so. Findings indicate that clients may seek to repress signs of abuse and will only disclose when asked directly, emphasising the need for active encouragement and reassurance to allow clients to feel safe in talking about more general experiences. They also highlight factors such as lack of confidence, knowledge or training in preventing questions about domestic violence being asked. The review identifies a need for further research to gauge how domestic abuse is tackled in specific health visiting situations.
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