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Hearn, Jeff (2014)
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Ltd
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: 512 Business and Management, KOTA2014, H1
Purpose\ud – The purpose of this paper is to reflect, personally, regarding work, politically and theoretically, on 40 years of involvement in organization studies, profeminism and intersectionality.\ud \ud Design/methodology/approach\ud – The paper uses autoethnography.\ud \ud Findings\ud – The paper shows the need for a broad notion of the field and fieldwork, the development of intersectional thinking, the complexity of men's relations to feminism and intersectionality and the need to both name and deconstruct men in the research field.\ud \ud Research limitations/implications\ud – The paper suggests a more explicit naming and deconstruction of men and other intersectional social categories in doing research.\ud \ud Practical implications\ud – The paper suggests a more explicit naming and deconstruction of men and other intersectional social categories in equality practice.\ud \ud Social implications\ud – The paper suggests a more explicit naming and deconstruction of men and other intersectional social categories in social, political and policy interventions.\ud \ud Originality/value\ud – The paper points to recent historical changes in the connections between feminism, gender, profeminism, organizations and intersectionality in relation to equality, diversity and inclusion.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • Collier, R. (2010), Men, Law and Gender: Essays on the 'Man' of Law, London: Routledge.
    • Collins, P.H. (1990), Black Feminist Thought, Boston: Unwin Hyman.
    • Collinson, D.L. and Hearn, J. (1994), “Naming men as men: implications for work, organizations and management”, Gender, Work and Organization, Vol. 1 No. 1, pp. 2-22.
    • Collinson, D.L. and Hearn, J. (2014), “Taking the obvious apart: men, masculinities and the dynamics of gendered leadership”, in R.J. Burke and D.A. Major (eds.) Gender in Organizations: Are Men Allies or Adversaries to Women's Career Advancement?, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, pp. 73-92.
    • Cornwall, A., Edström, J. and Greig, A. (eds.) (2011), Men and Development: Politicizing Masculinities, London: Zed.
    • Delphy, C. (197/), The Main Enemy: A Materialist Analysis of Women's Oppression, London: WRRC (trans. from L'Ennemi principal, 1970).
    • Edholm, F., Harris, O and Young, K. (1977), “Conceptualising women”, Critique of Anthropology, Vol. 3 Nos. 9-10, pp. 101-130.
    • Fanon, F. (1963), The Wretched of the Earth, New York: Grove (trans. from Les Damnés de la Terre, 1961).
    • Flam, H, Hearn, J., and Parkin, W. (2010), “Organizations, violations and their silencing”, in A.
    • Wettergren and B. Sieben (eds.) Emotionalizing Organizations and Organizing Emotions, Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 147-165.
    • Mitchell, J. (1966), “Women: the longest revolution”, New Left Review, No. 40, pp. 11-37.
    • O'Brien, M. (1981), The Politics of Reproduction, London: Routedge & Kegan Paul.
  • No related research data.
  • Discovered through pilot similarity algorithms. Send us your feedback.

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