LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Publisher: American Psychological Association
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: BF, RC0321, GT
The present study shows how motor expertise increases sensitivity to affective body movement at the behavioural and physiological level. Nineteen affective movement experts (professional ballet dancers) and twenty-four controls watched 96 video clips of emotionally expressive body movements while they performed an affect rating task (subjective response) and their galvanic skin response was recorded (psychophysiological response). The movements in the clips were either sad or happy, and in half of the trials movements were played in the order in which they are learned (forward presentation), and in the other half, backwards (control condition). Results showed that motor expertise in affective body movement specifically modulated both behavioural and physiological sensitivity to others’ affective body movement, and that this sensitivity is particularly strong when movements are shown in the way they are learnt (forward presentation). The evidence is discussed within current theories of proprioceptive arousal feedback and motor simulation accounts.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article