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Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
In this short article, Theodore Konstadinides (Lecturer in Law, University of Surrey) demonstrates the limited development of European defence cooperation within the auspices of CSDP. The author addresses two key questions, first on the degree of commitment to CSDP that Lisbon generates, and second on the level of integration achieved indirectly through EU coordination of the internal market aspects of the Member States’ defence policy in relation to armaments procurement. It is argued that although demonstrating a certain degree of progress, Lisbon’s reforms have not pushed towards an integrationist approach transforming, therefore, CSDP to an autonomous operational facility in defence matters. The Member States’ reticence to cede full authority to the EU in the field of defence is reflected in the Treaty’s wording which leaves intact national sovereignty in relation to military defence. As ever, the EU still relies on Member States and NATO with regard to all defence capability and force generation initiatives in post-Lisbon Europe.
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