LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Publisher: University of Huddersfield
Languages: English
Types: Book
Subjects: L1, LB

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION
There appears to be little research evidence on learners’ experience of learning with technology in taught curriculum time, how learners are engaged in learning with technology in this learning context, the learning strategies they use and associated learning outcomes.\ud By focussing on learning with technology in taught sessions and the strategies that learners use in this context, the present study aimed to investigate an important dimension of the concept of e-learning, which is often not associated with taught curriculum time, but more with independent self-directed study time (SDST).\ud The focus of the project would seem to be of interest at the present time of substantial investment across the educational sectors in technological provision and capability for computer access, Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) and online communication and information systems.\ud In order to meet the continuing challenge of delivering greater educational value from technology and realising significant benefits for learners (Crowne, 2007) the project aimed to identify learners’ strategies when using technology as a cognitive tool in taught curriculum sessions. The intention was that the findings would inform how we can develop more effective learning strategies using technology in taught sessions.\ud It was considered important to identify the continuities and discontinuities that currently occur between the Secondary school, FE and HE sectors in students’ learning with technology in taught curriculum time. Findings would inform support for increased learner engagement with technology in the three educational sectors and would sustain improvement in learner capability as students transfer from Secondary school to FE and into HE on their educational journey.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 2. Research questions...................................................................................9
    • 3. Methodology.............................................................................................10 3.1 How the study was undertaken...................................................................................... 10 3.2 Participants and learning contexts................................................................................. 10 3.3 Methods and instruments used...................................................................................... 11 3.4 How the data was analysed ........................................................................................... 12
    • 4. Results ......................................................................................................13 4.1 Quantitative results: Surveys ......................................................................................... 13 4.2. Qualitative Findings ...................................................................................................... 31
    • 5. Conclusions and recommendations ......................................................45 5.1 The use and usefulness of learning technologies in supporting learners' strategies in taught sessions .................................................................................................................... 45 5.2 Cognitive learning strategies (CLS) ............................................................................... 47 5.3 Active learning strategies (ALS)..................................................................................... 48 5.4 Learning outcomes ........................................................................................................ 50 5.5 In conclusion .................................................................................................................. 52 8. Contact information and acknowledgements........................................61
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article