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Pease, Peter (2013)
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: N200, C800, N600
Performance is arguably the most important dependent variable in Occupational Psychology (OP) but the way performance is measured in most OP studies fails to meet the evidence needs of business decision makers. This study systematically reviews performance evidence from 178 research papers across the discipline and suggests a multi-level model of performance based on a value added activity which takes into account individual performance and organisational performance measured in financial terms.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • Englert, P., Jackson, D. J. R., & van Gelderen, M. (2011). A Critical Examination of the Internal Consistency of Competencies Assessed Across Multiple Methods. The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Organisational Psychology, 4(01), 11-19.
    • Guest, D. E. (2011). Human resource management and performance: still searching for some answers. Human Resource Management Journal, 21(1), 3-13.
    • Kaplan, R. S., & Norton, D. P. (1996). Using the balanced scorecard as a strategic management system. Harvard Business Review, 74(1), 75-85.
    • Meyer, M. W. (2002). Finding performance: The new discipline in management: Cambridge University Press, UK.
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