LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Publisher: Society for Neuroscience
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
After consolidation, a process that requires gene expression and protein synthesis, memories are stable and highly resistant to disruption by amnestic influences. Recently, consolidated memory has been shown to become labile again after retrieval and to require a phase of reconsolidation to be preserved. New findings, showing that the dependence of reconsolidation on protein synthesis decreases with the age of memory, point to changing molecular requirements for reconsolidation during memory maturation. We examined this possibility by comparing the roles of protein synthesis (a general molecular requirement for memory consolidation) and the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) (a specific molecular requirement for memory consolidation), in memory reconsolidation at two time points after training. Using associative learning in Lymnaea, we show that reconsolidation after the retrieval of consolidated memory at both 6 and 24 h requires protein synthesis. In contrast, only reconsolidation at 6 h after training, but not at 24 h, requires PKA activity, which is in agreement with the measured retrieval-induced PKA activation at 6 h. This phase-dependent differential molecular requirement for reconsolidation supports the notion that even seemingly consolidated memories undergo further selective molecular maturation processes, which may only be detected by analyzing the role of specific pathways in memory reconsolidation after retrieval.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article