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Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
So reads the text on one of the earliest modern road signs, a ‘danger board’ issued by The Scottish Cyclists’ Union. It is one amongst a plethora of others issued by national cycling organisations in the early 1880s. In this paper I aim to consider the implications of this sign using some of the techniques of object-analysis. This is, perhaps, an unfashionable methodology in the realms of academic transport history as it is more associated with material culture coming through art and design history that has traditionally laid emphasis on the primacy of the object. It could also be seen as dangerously close to the activities of collectors and enthusiasts when placed in the transport realm, without the respectability of traditional connoisseurship enjoyed in the visual arts.
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