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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects: R1
Although mortality from diseases such as coronary heart disease, chronic obstructive\ud pulmonary disease, cancer, liver disease and type-two diabetes is decreasing,\ud morbidity and premature death is increasing. These conditions are related to a\ud number of risk factors, including health behaviours (smoking, diet, lack of physical\ud activity and alcohol consumption).\ud In an attempt to modify patients’ lifestyles, the delivery of a number of complex\ud psychosocial interventions has been attempted by healthcare practitioners in clinical\ud practice. However, in many cases interventions are not adequately described, and\ud there has been very little information regarding how practitioners were trained, and\ud indeed how well they were able to deliver the intervention. This makes evaluation of\ud the efficacy and effectiveness of these interventions difficult. There is a lack of\ud studies that evaluate which training methods lead to the best levels of skill\ud acquisition.\ud One intervention that has shown promise in helping patients to make changes to their\ud lifestyles is behaviour change counselling (BCC), an adaptation of motivational\ud interviewing. As with other complex interventions, the evaluation of skill\ud competence and training methods has been generally poor.\ud The studies in this thesis aim to tackle the issues of measuring skill acquisition in\ud BCC. An instrument - the Behaviour Change Counselling Index (BECCI) - was\ud developed to measure practitioner skill competence in delivering BCC. The\ud Experiential Practice Experiment was conducted to discover whether the use of\ud simulated patients, rather than role-play with fellow trainees lead to enhanced skill\ud acquisition in BCC. Participants also provided ratings of their practice sessions\ud within their experimental conditions. There was no significant difference in BECCI scores or ratings of practice sessions between practitioners who practiced skills with simulated patients in comparison to those who performed role-play. There may be a relationship between participants' feelings regarding the practice sessions and BCC skill acquisition, but results were inconclusive.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 1. The Behaviour Change Skills Rating Scale
    • 2. Provisional items and manual from Boycott (2001)
    • 3. BECCI and user manual
    • 4. Lane et al. (2005) Measuring adaptations of motivational
    • Appendix II..................................................................................................................... 381 1. Practitioner information/consent form 2. Case scenario - smoking - actor briefing 3. Case scenario - smoking - practitioner briefing 4. Case scenarios constructed by diabetes nurses 5. Letter from Leeds East Research Ethics Committee 6. Information sheet - real consultations 7. Patient consent form - real consultations 8. Practitioner consent form - real consultations
    • Appendix III................................................................................................................... 1. Workshop advertisement 2. Interview schedule 3. Practice Experiment Rating of Session Inventory (PERSI) 4. Demographic questionnaire 5. Block randomisation master list 6. Letter to workshop participants 7. Workshop information sheet 8. Training programmes - day one and day two 9. Information sheet 10. Consent form 11. Registers 12. Information sheet - on day 13. Example of a 'rounds sheet' 14. Cases 1-3 Patient briefing 15. Cases 1-3 Practitioner briefing
    • Appendix IV................................................................................................................... 1. Interview data - Free Node 2. Interview data - Training Node - positive experiences 3. Interview data - Training Node - negative experiences
    • Appendix V.................................................................................................................... 1. Histograms - figures AV. 1 to AV.7b 2. Correlation matrices - tables AV.l to AV.3 3. Eigenvalue tables - tables AV.4 to AV.6 4. Descriptives tables AV.7 to AV .l5 5. Skewness and kurtosis - table AV. 16
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