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Abu-Nimeh, S.; Chen, T.; Alzubi, O. (2011)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: QA
A large-scale study of more than half a million Facebook posts suggests that members of online social networks can expect a significant chance of encountering spam posts and a much lower but not negligible chance of coming across malicious links. © 2006 IEEE.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 1. N. Bilton, “Researcher Releases Facebook Profile Data,” The New York Times, 28 July 2010; http://bits.blogs.nytimes. com/2010/07/28/100-million-facebook-ids-compiledonline.
    • 2. S. Milgram, “The Small-World Problem,” Psychology Today, May 1967, pp. 61-67.
    • 3. S. Abu-Nimeh and T. Chen, “Proliferation and Detection of Blog Spam,” IEEE Security & Privacy, Sept./Oct. 2010, pp. 42-47.
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