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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Nayoan, Johana (2012)
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: humanities
Objective. Coronary heart disease has been on the rise in poorer countries and decreasing in developed countries over the last twenty years. However, the cardiac-related health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in poorer countries has not been studied. This study aimed to compare HRQOL following heart attack in a developing country in the East with that of a developed country in the West. Using the self-regulation of health and illness behaviour, the relationships between illness beliefs, coping cognitions and HRQOL are studied. Design. This study was a cross-sectional correlational survey and data were collected shortly before myocardial infarction patients were discharged from hospital. Methods. A sample of 243 individuals from the UK and Indonesia were recruited. Illness beliefs were assessed with the B-IPQ, along with coping cognitions (Brief-COPE) and health-related quality of life (MacNew questionnaire). Results. Illness beliefs and coping cognitions predicted HRQOL in the combined sample. Some aspects of socio-demographic and clinical variables were concurrently associated with HRQOL. Conclusion. The results demonstrate that people in the East have low illness beliefs and these are associated with worse HRQOL compared with those in the West. The findings suggest that there is an urgent need for smoking cessation campaigns in the East, while the West could benefit more from tailored-cardiac rehabilitation programme
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................. 236  ANALYSIS ......................................................................................................................................... 236  9.2.1  Correlational analyses between variables ..................................................................................... 237  9.2.2  Relationships between socio‐demographic and clinical variables with coping cognitions, illness  beliefs, and health‐related quality of life ...................................................................................................... 237  9.2.2.1  Illness beliefs and quality of life ............................................................................................... 244  9.2.2.2  Coping cognitions and health‐related quality of life ................................................................ 246  9.2.2.3  Illness beliefs and coping cognitions ........................................................................................ 246  9.2.3  Regression analyses....................................................................................................................... 248  9.2.3.1  Concurrent relationships between illness beliefs and coping with emotional‐related quality of  life  250 
    • 9.2.3.2  Concurrent relationships between cognitive coping and illness beliefs with physical‐related  quality of life 251 
    • 9.2.3.3  Concurrent relationships between coping cognitions and illness beliefs with social‐related  quality of life 251 
    • SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 252  INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................ 269  SAMPLE CHARACTERISTICS .............................................................................................................. 269  RESULTS ..................................................................................................................................... 271  11.3.1  Comparisons of first and non‐first heart attack ............................................................................ 271  11.3.2  Regressions analyses ..................................................................................................................... 275  11.3.2.1  Concurrent relationships between coping cognitions and illness beliefs with emotional‐related  quality of life 276 
    • 11.3.2.2  Concurrent relationships between coping cognitions and illness beliefs with physical‐related  quality of life 277 
    • 11.3.2.3  Concurrent relationships between coping cognitions and illness beliefs with social‐related  quality of life 278 
    • 11.3.3  Multivariate Analysis of Covariance .............................................................................................. 279  11.3.3.1  Comparisons of nationalities.................................................................................................... 281  11.3.3.2  Country differences in clinical risk factors ............................................................................... 282  11.3.3.3  Coping cognitions between countries ...................................................................................... 284  11.3.3.4  Illness beliefs, coping cognitions and health‐related quality of life in different ethnicities ..... 284  DISCUSSION ................................................................................................................................ 287 
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