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Anna Romanova; Mojtaba Mahmoodian; Upul Chandrasekara; Morteza A. Alani (2015)
Publisher: World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: sulphuric acid, built, corrosion rate., construction, concrete corrosion, concrete coupons, Sewer pipes, civil_eng
Corrosion of concrete sewer pipes induced by sulphuric acid attack is a recognised problem worldwide, which is not only an attribute of countries with hot climate conditions as thought before. The significance of this problem is by far only realised when the pipe collapses causing surface flooding and other severe consequences occur. To change the existing post- reactive attitude of managing companies, easy to use and robust models are required to be developed which currently lack reliable data to be correctly calibrated. This paper focuses on laboratory experiments of establishing concrete pipe corrosion rate by submerging samples in to 0.5pH sulphuric acid solution for 56 days under 10oC, 20oC and 30oC temperature regimes. The result showed that at very early stage of the corrosion process the samples gained overall mass, at 30oC the corrosion progressed quicker than for other temperature regimes, however with time the corrosion level for 10oC and 20oC regimes tended towards those at 30oC. Overall, at these conditions the corrosion rates of 10 mm/year, 13,5 mm/year and 17 mm/year were observed.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

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