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Baldwin, C.; Garza-Reyes, J.; Kumar, V. (2014)
Publisher: Emerald
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Purpose – The academic literature and motivational theory recognise the positive role of motivation on organisational performance and considers personal development as a key motivational factor. In practice, most organisations employ a Personal Development Review (PDR) process to drive and plan the development of their staff. This paper investigates the interrelation and impact of the PDR process, and its elements, on staff motivation. \ud \ud Design/methodology/approach – The study is based on a case study research approach carried out in two large manufacturing-engineering departments of a world-class manufacturing organisation. A survey questionnaire was designed, validated and distributed to the engineering staff and its results were analysed using descriptive statistics.\ud \ud Findings – The study’s results indicate that in most of the cases, a PDR process does not by itself motivate staff. But it argues that a poorly designed and conducted PDR process may make motivation, through personal development, difficult to achieve.\ud \ud Practical implications – This paper provides manufacturing managers with an opportunity to understand whether a common business process (i.e. PDR), and the elements that comprise it, can be employed as a method to aid in the motivation of their staff.\ud \ud Original value – This research expands the current knowledge on motivational and manufacturing management theory by performing an initial and exploratory study that establishes the impact of the PDR process on staff motivation. It is among the very first investigations that correlate the PDR process and motivation, especially in the manufacturing industry.
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