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Cumberland, P.; Sethi, D.; Roderick, P. J.; Wheeler, J. G.; Cowden, J. M.; Roberts, J. A.; Rodrigues, L. C.; Hudson, M. J.; Tompkins, D. S. (2003)
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Research Article
The sequelae of Infectious Intestinal Disease (IID) in a population-based sample of cases and matched controls were investigated for a period of 3 months following the initial infection. Incident cases of IID presenting to GPs or occurring in the community and controls were studied at 3 weeks and over a 3-month follow-up period. Cases were six times more likely than controls to have gastrointestinal symptoms, particularly diarrhoea, at 3 weeks. Ten per cent of cases consulted their GP in the 3 months after episode and 2.3% were referred to hospital. GP presentation rates were twice as high in cases. Gastrointestinal symptoms persist after IID, leading to an increased likelihood of GP consultation and hospital referral. Diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome may be more likely following IID. The burden of IID is likely to be considerable given its high incidence and the frequency of such sequelae.

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