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Rose, Richard
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: LA1151, LC1200, LC3950
International agreements including the Salamanca Statement and Framework and the Millennium Development Goals have influenced policy for marginalised groups of learners across the world. The intention to provide education systems that are both equitable and inclusive has been incorporated into policies in many countries. In this presentation I argue that the notion of inclusion is based upon western political and socio-economic conditions and has been inadequately defined for socially and economically disadvantaged countries. The essential movement towards greater inclusion will be achived only when an understanding of those conditions that may impede development are addressed. Rather than debating inclusion we would be well advised to consider inclusions and to accept that communities need to find their own solutions to complex educational issues

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