LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Chibici-Revneanu, Claudia
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects: HQ, PN
This dissertation examines the concept of artistic genius and its workings\ud as a functional ‘charter myth’, helping to inscribe, enhance and perpetuate\ud discriminative practices against women within the field of literature in general\ud and novel writing in particular.\ud As an active agent as well as symbolic representation of some core\ud patriarchal values such as the innate supremacy and thus justified dominance of\ud men, the concept of genius operates in the following manner: Firstly, through its\ud multiple mythical elements such as the untruth of its affirmations surrounding\ud creativity combined with a paradoxical ability to nevertheless produce evidence\ud for its seeming accuracy; its inherent narrative structure featuring a prescribed\ud genius hero and tale and the latter’s powerful mythical allure, all of which help to\ud push the prominence of genius despite its continued academic deconstruction.\ud Secondly, through the subtle yet powerful gendering of the protagonist and plot\ud pattern it provides, containing a clear blue-print for a hero with a male body\ud complemented or opposed by a subordinate, non-genius female.\ud This gendered mythical pattern directly affects women writers in a variety\ud of manners. On the one hand, it assists the lastingly biased reception of women\ud authors, pre-imposing genius-inscribed beliefs of female inferiority onto literary\ud judgments, thus cyclically perpetuating that belief. On the other – and most\ud importantly for this thesis – the myth of genius also has an inward bearing on\ud many female writers, impeding their creative process and development especially\ud through the myth’s complex interaction with self-confidence as one of the core\ud features necessary for a successful completion of literary projects such as novels.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • PART 1: IN-GENIUS CIRCLES……………………………………………..51 2. Genius as a Myth 2.1. Introduction…………………………………………………………….52 2.2. What is a Myth?.......................................................................................53 2.3. Believed in but untrue…………………………………………………..56 2.4. A story?....................................................................................................68 2.5. A mythical tale?.......................................................................................74 2.6. The importance of being mythical……………………………………...78 2.7. Conclusion……………………………………………………………...84 6. Genius through the Stages of Creativity
    • 6.1. Introduction…………………………………………………………...218 6.2. Stage One: Volition and Permission…………..………………………219 6.3. Stage Two: Execution and Revision……….………………………….251 6.4. Stage Three: Release and Reception..………………………………...269 6.5. Conclusion…………………………………………………………….282 7. Ways Forward and Conclusion
    • 7.1. Introduction…………………………………………………………...284 7.2. Limitations and suggestions for future research………………………287 7.3. Implications of findings and ways forward…………………………...292 Bentley, Toni, 'Life, and My Evil Ex-Boyfriend', The New York Times, 23 September 2007 [consulted at http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9901E3D6133DF930A15 75AC0A9619C8B63 (accessed April 2011)].
    • Carruthers, Mary Jay, 'The Re-vision of the Muse, Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Judy Grahn, Olga Broumas', in The Hudson Review, 36.2 (Summer 1983), pp.293-322 [consulted at (accessed November 2010)].
    • Eliot, George, 'Silly Novels by Lady Novelists', The Westminster Review, 66 (old series), 10 (new series) (October 1856), pp. 442-461 [consulted at (accessed July 2010)].
    • Enright, Anne, in 'Ten Rules for Writing', The Guardian, 20 February 2010 [consulted at (accessed July 2010)].
    • Gladwell, Malcolm, 'The Talent Myth - Are Smart People Overrated?', The New Yorker, 22 July 2002, pp.28-32 [consulted at , accessed December 2010)].
    • Guest, Katy, 'The Big Question - Has the Time Come to Close the Book on Women-Only Literary Prizes', The Independent, 6 June 2008 [consulted at
    • Harding, Luke, 'Leo Tolstoy - The Forgotten Genius', The Guardian, 6 January 2010 [consulted at , (accessed March 2010)].
    • Laurance, Jeremy, 'You Don't Have to be Bipolar to be a Genius - But it Helps', The Independent, 3 February 2010 [consulted at (accessed April 2010)].
    • Mcinerney, Jay, ''Indecision' - Getting it Together', The New York Times, 28 August 2005 [consulted at (accessed July 2010)].
    • Atwood, Margaret, 'Paradoxes and Dilemmas, the Woman as a Writer', in Feminist Literary Theory, - A Reader, in Mary Eagleton (ed.), Feminist Literary Theory - A Reader (Oxford, New York: Basil Blackwell, 1986), pp. 74-77.
    • Bandura, Albert, 'Self-Efficacy', in V.S. Ramachaudran (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Behaviour, Vol. 4, pp. 71-81, (New York: Academic Press, 1994), [consulted at (accessed November 2010)].
    • Baer, J, 'Gender differences in the effects of anticipated evaluation on creativity', Creativity Research Journal, 10.1 1997, pp. 25-31.
    • Beyer, Sylvia, 'Gender differences in causal attributions by college students of performance on course examinations', in Current Psychology, 17.4 (December 1998), pp. 346-59.
    • Barthes, Roland, 'Death of the Author', in Image, Music, Text (London: Fontana Press, 1977), pp. 142-48.
    • Battersby, Christine, Gender and Genius - Towards a Feminist Aesthetics (London: Women's Press, 1989).
    • Becker, Ernest, Birth and Death of Meaning - A Perspective in Psychiatry and Anthropology (New York: The Free Press of Glencoe, 1962).
    • Bengis, Ingrid, 'The Middle Period', in Sternburg (ed), The Writer on Her Work, pp. 141-152.
    • Bilton, Chris, Management and Creativity - From Creative Industries to Creative Management (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2007).
    • Björkegren, Dag, The Culture Business - Management Strategies for the ArtsRelated Business (London, New York: Routledge, 1996).
    • Bloom, Howard, Genius - A Mosaic of One Hundred Exceptional Minds (London: Fourth Estate, 2002).
    • 'Bloom, Harold: Interview' (1991), in Philip Gourevitch (ed.), The Paris Review Interviews, Vol. 2, (Edinburgh: Canongate, 2007), pp. 306-354.
    • Bloom, Harold, The Anxiety of Influence - A Theory of Poetry (New York: Oxford University Press, 1973).
    • Boal, Augusto Theatre of the Oppressed (London: Pluto Press, 1998, c1974).
    • Boden, Margaret, The Creative Mind - Myths and Mechanisms (London: Abacus, 1992).
    • Bollinger, Lee, O'Neill, Carole, Women in Media Careers - Success Despite the Odds (Lanham, Plymouth: University Press of America, 2008).
    • Bourdieu, Pierre, Distinction - A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1992, c1979).
    • Bourdieu, Pierre, The Rules of Art - Genesis and Structure of the Literary Field (Cambridge: Polity, 2009 c1996).
    • Brande, Dorothea, Becoming a Writer (reprint, with intro by John Gardner, New York: Penguin Putnam, 1981).
    • Burroway, Jane, in 'Opening Nights - The Opening Days', in Sternburg (ed.), The Writer on Her Work, pp. 187-216.
    • Calonne, David Stephen, 'Creative Writers and Revision', in Horning Alice and Becker Anne (eds.), Revision - History, Theory and Practice (Parlour Press and WAC Clearing House, 2006) [consulted at (accessed November 2010)].
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article