LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Verwichte, E. (Erwin); Nakariakov, V. M. (Valery M.); Cooper, F. C. (Fenwick C.) (2005)
Publisher: EDP Sciences
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: QB

Classified by OpenAIRE into

arxiv: Physics::Space Physics, Astrophysics::Solar and Stellar Astrophysics
Observations of propagating transverse waves in an open magnetic field structure with the Transition Region And\ud Coronal Explorer (TRACE) are presented. Waves associated with dark tadpole-like sunward moving structures in the post-flare supra-arcade of NOAA active region 9906 on the 21st of April 2002 are analysed. They are seen as quasi-periodic transverse displacements of the dark tadpole tails, with periods in the range of 90–220 s. Their phase speeds and displacement amplitudes decrease as they propagate sunwards. At heights of 90 and 60 Mm above the post-flare loop footpoints the phase speeds are in\ud the ranges 200–700 km s −1 and 90–200 km s\ud −1 respectively. Furthermore, for consecutive tadpoles the phase speeds decrease and periods increase as a function of time. The waves are interpreted as propagating fast magnetoacoustic kink waves guided by a vertical, evolving, open structure.\ud
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • to 4. Discussion
  • No related research data.
  • No similar publications.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article