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Watts, Helen; Francis-Smythe, Jan
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: H1, HD28, BF
Applied Occupational Psychology research provides a valuable evidence base which can potentially be used to inform and improve organisational practice. In reality, however, its actual usage in organisational practice is not a given. After a brief overview of the characteristics of applied research and the challenges faced when conducting it, the valuable role that applied research can have in interpreting organisational behaviour and developing\ud interventions is emphasised. However, this is just the first hurdle for applied researchers, seeking to bridge their research-practice gap. Whilst researchers might succeed in applying their findings to the development of an intervention or practical recommendations, numerous\ud challenges may be encountered during the actual application of these interventions/ recommendations into organisational practice. Subsequently, the gap between research and\ud practice is at risk of remaining unbridged. Using my own PhD research as an exemplar ("Membership retention in the health and fitness industry: A predictive model"), these issues will be illustrated and discussed, including ways in which the gap between research and practice can be successfully bridged.
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