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Baker, TR; Pennington, RT; Dexter, KG; Fine, PVA; Fortune-Hopkins, H; Honorio, EN; Huamantupa-Chuquimaco, I; Klitgård, BB; Lewis, GP; De Lima, HC; Ashton, P; Baraloto, C; Davies, S; Donoghue, MJ; Kaye, M; Kress, WJ; Lehmann, CER; Monteagudo, A; Phillips, OL; Vasquez, R (2017)
Publisher: Elsevier (Cell Press)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Closer collaboration among ecologists, systematists, and evolutionary biologists working in tropical forests, centred on studies within long-term permanent plots, would be highly beneficial for their respective fields. With a key unifying theme of the importance of vouchered collection and precise identification of species, especially rare ones, we identify four priority areas where improving links between these communities could achieve significant progress in biodiversity and conservation science: (i) increasing the pace of species discovery; (ii) documenting species turnover across space and time; (iii) improving models of ecosystem change; and (iv) understanding the evolutionary assembly of communities and biomes.

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