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Mannay, Dawn
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: BF, H1, HT, PN
Within the social sciences, there is an increasing move towards visual and creative methods of data collection employing photographs, collages, film and walking narratives. These methods have the potential of ‘making the familiar strange’ and opening windows to new worlds (Mannay 2010); however, they also engender pathways beyond the research remit into the realm of unintended consequences: for both researcher and researched (Mannay 2011; 2013). The images and conversations generated in such research are often embedded with powerful emotions that are embedded in present selves and resonant of past biographies. However, when researchers come to publish this work the creativity of their data is often constrained by academic conventions that impose dense, dry, flat prose as the communicative exemplar. The priorities of publishing can hinder our ability to write in an accessible way but when we are writing as a project of social justice it is important to engage both cognitively and emotionally with an audience. Drawing on research with mothers and daughters residing in a marginalised area in south Wales, this paper focuses on impact by exploring the process of liberation through writing; and the ways in which poetic writing exploits reflection and can inspire an audience to make changes.
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