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Goulas, Sofoklis; Megalokonomou, Rigissa (2015)
Publisher: University of Warwick. Department of Economics
Languages: English
Types: Book
Subjects: LB, HB

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: education
We study the effect of disclosing relative performance information (feedback) on students' performance in high-school and on subsequent university enrolment. We exploit a large scale natural experiment where students in some cohorts are provided with their national and school relative performance. Using unique primary collected data, we find an asymmetric response to the relative performance information: high achieving students improve their last-year performance by 0.15 standard deviations whereas the last-year performance of low achieving students drops by 0.3 standard deviations. The results are more pronounced for females indicating greater sensitivity to feedback. We also document the long term effect of feedback provision: high achieving students reduce their repetition rate of the national exams, enrol into 0.15 standard deviations more popular University Departments and their expected annual earnings increase by 0.17 standard deviations. Results are opposite for low achieving students. We nd suggestive evidence that feedback encourages more students from low-income neighborhoods to enrol in university and to study in higher-quality programs indicating a potential decrease in income inequality.
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    • 1Other determinants of the educational production function that have been studied are: studies on class size (Angrist and Lavy 1999, Krueger 1999, Hoxby 2000b), teachers' training and certi cation (Angrist and Lavy 2001, Kane et al. 2008), quality of teacher (Rocko 2004, Rivkin et al. 2005), tracking (Du o et al. 2011), peer
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