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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Khalid, Sarah Jane
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects: dewey360, dewey610

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: integumentary system, skin and connective tissue diseases
Vitiligo is a chronic skin disorder, which de-pigments parts or all of the skin. This disfiguring condition presents individual sufferers with many challenges. Studies have shown an adverse psychological impact of living with such a skin condition. However, no studies to date have explored the experience of vitiligo from a purely male perspective. This study sought to provide some preliminary understanding of and insight into men’s experience of vitiligo. A qualitative design was employed and the study was conducted using semi-structured interviews with six participants from a white British background who were all members of the Vitiligo Society UK. Three arching themes were found: processing the vitiligo diagnosis, focus on self and managing relationships. These findings are relevant to the theoretical understanding of the psychological impact that skin disorders can have on men. The applicability of these findings for Counselling Psychology practice in the management of vitiligo is discussed and future areas for research are suggested.

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