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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Buehler, Michael (2013)
Publisher: USAID
Languages: English
Types: Other
Subjects: 8510, 4600
As part of the DRG Assessment process, USAID commissions an independent expert on the democratic transition in the\ud subject country or region to undertake a peer review of the Final Report. The purpose of the peer review is to provide an external commentary on how well the DRG Assessment captures the essential political dynamics of the subject country and the soundness of its analysis and recommendations. The review offers an expert opinion on the overall quality of the report; it identifies any\ud innovative findings that may have emerged in the up-to-date DRG Assessment; it points out any key gaps in the analysis as well as noting differences of political interpretation; it evaluates the extent to which the recommendations are logically derived from the analysis; and provides an occasion for the reviewer to comment on the overall appropriateness of USAID’s DRG methodology for elaborating a DRG strategic approach that is rooted in a clear and compelling understanding of a country’s political dynamic
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    • Anthony Saich et al. “From Reformasi to Institutional Transformation: A Strategic Assessment of Indonesia's Prospects for Growth, Equity, and Democratic Governance,” (Ash Center for Governance and Innovation, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, April 24, 2010) pp.v-vi. http://unpan1.un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/UN-DPADM/UNPAN042322.pdf.
    • 11 The power of organized social movements as catalysts of change is well documented in scholarly research. Some examples include the importance of the women' suffrage movement in the United States leading to women's right to vote (Leanor Flexner and Ellen Fitzpatrick, Century of Struggle. The Women's Right Movement in the United States. Harvard College, 1959); the enactment of stronger environmental regulations in the United States and many European countries as a result of the environmental movement (Alain Touraine, Anti-Nuclear Protest: The opposition to nuclear energy in France. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1983); the power of social movements in Latin America during the 1960s and 1970s in helping to pave the way for political change in the 1990s (Susan Eckstein, ed. Power and Popular Protest. Latin American Social Movements. Berkeley and Los Angeles, University of California Press, 2001); the power of urban social movements in bringing about broader political change in their cities and successfully overcoming the resistance of dominant interests that resist change (Manuel Castells, The City and the Grassroots. Berkeley and Los Angeles, University of California Press, 1983); and the importance of the Solidarity labor movement in Poland to bring about political change (Alain Touraine, Solidarity: The analysis of a social movement: Poland 1980-1981. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1983).
    • 12 The Indonesian Survey Institute (LSI) has conducted yearly surveys asking people whether they believe democracy is the best form of government. In 2011, the last available survey, 77.3 percent of people interviewed agreed with the statement that democracy is the best form of government. http://www.lsi.or.id/riset/403/Rilis%20LSI%2029%20Mei%202011.
    • 13 Turnout rates in legislative elections of 1999, 2004, and 2009 were 93.3 percent, 84.9 percent, and 70.99 percent, respectively. http://www.lsi.or.id/riset/403/Rilis%20LSI%2029%20Mei%202011. Turnout rates in presidential elections are also high, with 75.2 percent in the second round presidential election in 2004 and 82.5 percent in the presidential elections of 2009. See IFES election guide. http://www.electionguide.org/reports1.php?region=5&country=102&type=1&round_num=0&start_month=01&start_year=2000&end_mont h=12&end_year=2012&submitted=1&submit.x=45&submit.y=16.
    • 15 Christian von Luebke, “Post-Suharto Indonesia: Democratic Consolidation and Continuing Challenges.” (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University, Fall 2009) http://iis-db.stanford.edu/docs/381/Post-Suharto.pdf.
    • 16 R. William Liddle and Saiful Mujani, “Indonesia's Democracy: From Transition to Consolidation,” in Alfred Stepan and Mirjam Kunkler, eds., Indonesia, Islam and Democratic Consolidation. New York: Columbia University Press, forthcoming.
    • 23 According to a recent New York Times report, since 2003,the Indonesian police have “arrested more than 700 militants and killed about 60”. NYT, October 29, 2012.
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    • Eckstein, Susan (ed.) (2001). Power and Popular Protest. Latin American Social Movements. Berkeley and Los Angeles, University of California Press.
    • Flexner, Leanor and Ellen Fitzpatrick. (1959). Century of Struggle. The Women's Right Movement in the United States. Harvard College.
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    • Gershman, Jacob. (2013). “U.S. Asks Supreme Court To Look at Judicial Pay Dispute,” The Wall Street Journal, 14 January. Available at http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2013/01/14/u-s-asks-supreme-court-to-look-atjudicial-pay-dispute/
    • Hammergren, Linn A. (2007). Envisioning reform: improving judicial performance in Latin America. Penn State University Press.
    • Saich, Anthony and David Dapice, Tarek Masoud, Dwight Perkins, Jonathan Pincus, Jay Rosengard, Thomas Vallely, Ben Wilkinson, and Jeffrey Williams. (2010). “From Reformasi to Institutional Transformation: A Strategic Assessment of Indonesia's Prospects for Growth, Equity, and Democratic Governance.” Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Kennedy School of Government, University of Harvard, Cambridge, MA. Available at http://unpan1.un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/UN-DPADM/UNPAN042322.pdf.
    • Scanlon, Megan (2012), STATT, NGO sector review. Findings Report: Draft, Revisions 1”. AusAID Indonesia. November. Mimeo.
    • Schneider, Jane C. and Peter T. Schneider. (2003). Reversible Destiny: Mafia, Antimafia, and the Struggle for Palermo. Berkeley: University of California Press.
    • Schonhardt, Sara. (2012). “Plot on U.S. Targets Cited in 11 Arrests by Indonesia,” New York Times, October 29.
    • Setiyono, Budi and Ross H. McLeod. (2010). “ Civil society organisations' Contribution to the Anticorruption Movement in Indonesia.” Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, 23 November, 2010.
    • Shair-Rosenfeld, Sarah. (2012). “The alternative incumbency effect: Electing women legislators in Indonesia.” Electoral Studies, 31, 2012.
    • Sherlock, Stephen. (2010). “The Parliament in Indonesia's Decade of Democracy: People's Forum or Chamber of Cronies?,” in Edward Aspinall and Marcus Mietzner, eds. Problems of Democratisation in Indonesia, Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.
    • Skoufias, Emmanuel, Ambar Narayan, Basab Dasgupta, and Kai Kaiser. (2011).”Electoral accountability, fiscal decentralization and service delivery in Indonesia.” World Bank Policy Research Working Paper Series, No. 5614, 2011. Jakarta: The World Bank.
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    • Von Luebke, Christian. (2009). “Post-Suharto Indonesia: Democratic Consolidation and Continuing Challenges” Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University. http://iisdb.stanford.edu/docs/381/Post-Suharto.pdf.
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