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Buchan, DS; Boddy, LM; Despres, JP; Grace, FM; Sculthorpe, N; Mahoney, C; Baker, JS
Publisher: Wiley: 12 months
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: RC1200
Background: It is unclear whether the Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype can be used to identify those at most risk of cardiometabolic disorders.\ud \ud Objectives: The utility of the Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype (HTWP) as a useful predictor of cardiometabolic risk in youth stratified by body mass index (BMI) was assessed.\ud \ud Methods: Three hundred and eighty seven children (12-17.5 years) were used within this cross-sectional study. Participants were classified as normal weight or overweight/obese according to the IOTF criteria. The HTWP phenotype was defined as having a waist circumference ≥ 90th percentile for age and gender with concomitant triglyceride concentrations ≥ 1.24 mmol/L. Cardiometabolic risk profiles were compared using MANCOVA.\ud \ud Results: Normal weight participants with the HTWP had significantly higher levels of C-reactive protein 2.6 ± 0.4 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3 mg/L (P < 0.05) and cardiometabolic risk scores (1.3 ± 0.3 vs. -0.7 ± 0.2 and 2.1 ± 0.4 vs. -0.5 ± 0.2; both P < 0.05) compared to those of a normal weight without the HTWP. Overweight/obese participants with the HTWP had significantly higher C-reactive protein levels (3.5 ± 0.6 vs. 2.6 ± 0.5; P < 0.05) as well as both cardiometabolic risk scores (1.6 ± 0.6 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 and 2.2 ± 0.6 vs. 0.8 ± 0.2; both P < 0.001) when compared to overweight/obese participants without the HTWP.\ud \ud Conclusions:\ud The HTWP may serve as a simple and clinically useful approach to identify youth at increased cardiometabolic risk.

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