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Money, J; Dinning, TM; Nixon, S; Walsh, BA; Magill, C
Publisher: Scientific Research Publishing
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: LB2300, LB2361, LB

Classified by OpenAIRE into

ACM Ref: ComputingMilieux_COMPUTERSANDEDUCATION
Involving students in the design and development of their curriculum is well established in Higher\ud Education but comes with challenges and concerns for both the staff and students. This is not a\ud simple concept and understanding more about the experiences of the student co-creators supports\ud others in developing this aspect of curriculum design. This small scale project uses the individual\ud and collective voices of five second year students who worked with one programme team to\ud co-create a transition module to support new learners entering university. The study explores the\ud co-creation experience and the student’s response to the feedback their co-created curriculum\ud received when it was run for the first time. The study was designed to consider if co-creation of a\ud module was beneficial to the students involved in its co-creation. The findings explored issues in\ud relation to the experience, the actual design of the materials and how this could be developed. The\ud students enjoyed the co-creation, felt appreciated and listened to and felt that this was a positive\ud learning experience. They realised how difficult it is to please everybody and gained a much better\ud appreciation of building learning experiences for others to use. The research highlights the fact\ud that with regards to curriculum development within universities that students should be involved\ud in co-creation as they have an understanding of the requirements of learning form a student perspective.\ud Whilst student satisfaction cannot be necessarily be measured directly, the anecdotal\ud comments from students involved in this project as they graduate are the values they place on the\ud opportunities afforded to them.

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