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Dalziel, C. J.; Kliem, Kirsty E.; Givens, D. Ian (2015)
Publisher: Elsevier
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: food and beverages
This study compared fat and fatty acids in cooked retail chicken meat from conventional and organic systems. Fat contents were 1.7, 5.2, 7.1 and 12.9 g/100 g cooked weight in skinless breast, breast with skin, skinless leg and leg with skin respectively, with organic meat containing less fat overall (P < 0.01). Meat was rich in cis-monounsaturated fatty acids, although organic meat contained less than did conventional meat (1850 vs. 2538 mg/100 g; P < 0.001). Organic meat was also lower (P < 0.001) in 18:3 n−3 (115 vs. 180 mg/100 g) and, whilst it contained more (P < 0.001) docosahexaenoic acid (30.9 vs. 13.7 mg/100 g), this was due to the large effect of one supermarket. This system by supermarket interaction suggests that poultry meat labelled as organic is not a guarantee of higher long chain n−3 fatty acids. Overall there were few major differences in fatty acid contents/profiles between organic and conventional meat that were consistent across all supermarkets.

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