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Kruschwitz, Peter (2015)
Publisher: Peter Kruschwitz
Languages: English
Types: Book
Subjects:
An anthology (comprising introduction, text, translation, and notes) of Britain's most ancient (surviving) poetry (Latin/Greek, with an English translation).
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • 1. Corellia Optata / Belied Hope........................................................ 8
    • 2. Inuida Iuno / Jealous Juno ............................................................ 10
    • 3. Felices ... plus minus / Happy, More or Less ............................... 12
    • 4. Virgo Caelestis / Tanit, the Heavenly Virgin ............................... 14
    • 5. Do ut des / A Golden Deal ........................................................... 16
    • 6. Vergilius Britannicus / Vergil in Britain ...................................... 18
    • 7. Ἀστάρτης βωμός / An Altar for Astarte ....................................... 20
    • 8. Prisca religio / Back to the Roots ................................................ 22
    • 9. Ἑρμῆς Κομμαγηνός / Hermes of Commagene ............................. 24
    • 10. Neptunus et Cupido / Identifying Neptune and Cupid.................. 26
    • 11. Alterum Vergilianum / More Vergil ... or Vergil Altered? ........... 28
    • 12. Austalis uagatur / Wayward Austalis ........................................... 30
    • 13. ᾽Αρχιέρεια / The Archpriestess..................................................... 32
    • 14. Iulia Fortunata / Julia Fortunata .................................................. 34
    • 15. Armea / Armea ............................................................................. 36
    • 16. Deo qui ... / To the God Who ... ................................................... 38
    • 17. Nymphis uenerandis / To the Venerable Nymphs ........................ 40
    • 18. Ablata repente / Snatched Away Suddenly .................................. 42
    • 19. Πόλεμος πάντων πατήρ / War is the Father of All Things ........... 44
    • 20. Frag|[- - -] / Frag|[ment - - -] ....................................................... 46
    • 21. ᾽Aντίοχος εἰητρός / Antiochus the Doctor.................................... 48
    • 22. Antigonus Papias / Antigonus Papias........................................... 50 Bibliography: A. K. Bowman - J. D. Thomas, The Vindolanda Writing Tablets (Tabulae Vindolandenses II), London 1994, 65-67 (also available at http://vindolanda.
    • csad.ox.ac.uk); M. C. Scappaticcio, Papyri Vergilianae: l'apporto della Papirologia alla Storia della Tradizione virgiliana (I-VI d. C.), Liège 2013, 141-142 no. 23; A. K. Bowman, Life and Letters on the Roman Frontier. Vindolanda and Its People, London 32003, 11, 88-89; P.
    • Kruschwitz, T. Vindol. II 118: An Obscene Joke from Vindolanda?, Tyche 29 (2014) 271-2.
    • 18. EE IX 1113; CLE 2267; RIB 265 (with drawing). - Fragment of a limestone tombstone (66 x 43 x 17 cm), possibly dating to the third or fourth century A. D. Discovered around 1905 in Lindum / Lincoln. Now in Lincoln Museum (inv. no. LCNCC 1906.10898). A poem for a girl who died young: its poetic nature is established by its wording as well as an overall dactylic rhythm of the words that remain. - For Dis, a Roman god of the underworld cf. also above, on item 1. The few remaining phrases of this fragment create a hauntingly beautiful, if entirely unintentional, atmosphere. Bibliography: Cugusi, Carmi epigrafici 216-7 no. 15; Schumacher, Die Carmina Latina Epigraphica 108-14 no. 7 (with photo).
    • R. Ling, 'Inscriptions on Romano-British Mosaics and Wall-Paintings', Britannia 38 (2007) 63-91.
    • M. G. Schmidt, 'Carmina Latina Epigraphica', in: C. Bruun - J. Edmondson (edd.), The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy, Oxford University Press: Oxford - New York 2014, 764-82.
    • M. Schumacher, Die Carmina Latina Epigraphica des römischen Britannien, Diss. phil. Freie Universität Berlin 2012 [http://www.diss.fuberlin.de/diss/receive/FUDISS_thesis_000000040 118].
    • A. A. Barrett, 'Knowledge of the Literary Classics in Roman Britain', Britannia 9 (1978) 307-10.
    • G. de la Bédoyère, Companion to Roman Britain, Tempus: Stroud 1999.
    • S. S. Frere, Britannia: A History of Roman Britain, Routledge: London 1978.
    • S. Ireland, Roman Britain: A Sourcebook, Croom Helm: London 1986.
    • D. Mattingly, An Imperial Possession. Britain in the Roman Empire, Allen Lane, Penguin Books: London 2006.
    • M. Millett, The Romanisation of Britain, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge 1990.
    • P. Salway, Roman Britain, Clarendon Press: Oxford 1981.
    • P. Salway, A History of Roman Britain, Oxford University Press: Oxford 2001.
    • P. Salway, Short Oxford History of the British Isles. The Roman Era: The British Isles 55 BC-AD 410, Oxford University Press: Oxford 2002.
    • M. Todd, A Companion to Roman Britain, Blackwell: Oxford 2004.
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