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Lee, S. Y.; Kesebir, S.; Pillutla, M. M. (2016)
Publisher: American Psychological Association
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: LQ, FDD, gender differences, competition, cooperation, work relationships, gender socialization, ACNR

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: education
We take a relational perspective to explain how women and men may differently experience competition with their same-gender coworkers. According to gender socialization research, the female peer culture values harmony and the appearance of equality, whereas hierarchical ranking is integral to the male peer culture. As competition dispenses with equality and creates a ranking hierarchy, we propose that competition is at odds with the norms of female (but not male) peer relationships. On this basis, we predicted and found in 1 correlational study and 3 experiments that women regard competition with their same-gender coworkers as less desirable than men do, and that their relationships with each other suffer in the presence of competition. We discuss the implications of these findings for women’s career progression.
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