LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT

Username
Password
Remember Me
Or use your Academic/Social account:

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Or use your Academic/Social account:

Congratulations!

You have just completed your registration at OpenAire.

Before you can login to the site, you will need to activate your account. An e-mail will be sent to you with the proper instructions.

Important!

Please note that this site is currently undergoing Beta testing.
Any new content you create is not guaranteed to be present to the final version of the site upon release.

Thank you for your patience,
OpenAire Dev Team.

Close This Message

CREATE AN ACCOUNT

Name:
Username:
Password:
Verify Password:
E-mail:
Verify E-mail:
*All Fields Are Required.
Please Verify You Are Human:
fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Dobb, Helen L.
Languages: English
Types: Doctoral thesis
Subjects:

Classified by OpenAIRE into

arxiv: Physics::Optics, Mathematics::Algebraic Geometry, Physics::Atomic Physics
mesheuropmc: genetic structures
This thesis presents the fabrication of fibre gratings in novel optical fibres for sensing applications. Long period gratings have been inscribed into photonic crystal fibre using the electric-arc technique. The resulting sensing characteristics were found to depend on the air-hole geometry of the particular fibre. This provides the potential of designing a fibre to have enhanced sensitivity to a particular measure and whilst removing unwanted cross sensitivities. Fibre Bragg gratings have been fabricated in a variety of polymer optical fibres, including microstructured polymer optical fibre, using a continuous wave helium cadmium laser. The thermal response of the gratings have been characterised and found to have enhanced sensitivity compared to fibre Bragg gratings in silica optical fibre. The increased sensitivity has been harnessed to achieve a grating based device in single mode step index polymer optical fibre by fabricating an electrically tunable fibre Bragg grating. This was accomplished by coating the grating region in a thin layer of copper, which upon application of a direct current, causes a temperature induced Bragg wavelength shift.

Share - Bookmark

Cite this article