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Xie, Zhi-Peng; Du, Jun; McLoughlin, Ian Vince; Xu, Yong; Ma, Feng; Wang, Haikun (2016)
Publisher: IEEE
Languages: English
Types: Unknown
Subjects: T
Recently, the signal captured from a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) sensor been used to improve the noise robustness automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems by enhancing the acoustic signal prior to feature extraction. This study proposes another approach in which auxiliary features extracted from the LDV signal are used alongside conventional acoustic features to further improve ASR performance based on the use of a deep neural network (DNN) as the acoustic model. While this approach is promising, the best training data sets for ASR do not include LDV data in parallel with the acoustic signal. Thus, to leverage such existing large-scale speech databases, a regres- sion DNN is designed to map acoustic features to LDV features. This regression DNN is well trained from a limited size parallel signal data set, then used to form pseudo-LDV features from a massive speech data set for parallel training of an ASR system. Our experiments show that both the features from the limited scale LDV data set as well as the massive scale pseudo-LDV features are able to train an ASR system that significantly outperforms one using acoustic features alone, in both quiet and noisy environments.

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