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Jackson, D.; Wilton, N. (2016)
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects:
Globalisation, organisational restructuring and new technology have been connected with a shift to ‘protean’ and ‘boundaryless’ career attitudes with workers, including new graduates, increasingly required to be self-reliant in successfully navigating their careers. This study explores protean and boundaryless career attitudes among Business undergraduates and the influence of demographic, background, and employment characteristics on these attitudes. Data were collected for Business undergraduates at a UK (N=88) and Australian university (N=284). Results indicate the students score more highly, on average, in the self-direction and boundaryless mindset dimensions. Relatively lower mean scores for physical mobility and values-driven suggests a ‘one high, one low’ pattern among the two items that constitute protean and boundaryless career attitudes. Employment status and Business degree specialisation were found to significantly predict career attitudes. Findings develop our understanding of whether emerging professionals are equipped to effectively self-manage their careers and implications for educators and professional practitioners are discussed.
  • The results below are discovered through our pilot algorithms. Let us know how we are doing!

    • Table 4 Descriptive statistics and correlations (N=372) Variable M SD α 1 2 1. Age 25.15 7.09 2. Gender -.02 3T.ouSrpiesmcialisation: -.08 .02 4M. aSrkpeetciinaglisation: -.18** .10 5H.RSMpecialisation: .02 .08 6G.enSepreacliiastlisation: -.08 -.03 7M. aSnpaegceimaleisnattion: -.05 -.09 8O.thSeprecialisation: .09 -.14** s9Pt.Tatus:EmpWlooyrmkienngt -.21** .09 s1Ft0Ta.tus:EmpWlooyrmkienngt .20** -.05 11. Self-direction 4.03 .56 .78 .00 .01 12. Values-driven 3.48 .75 .78 .06 -.05 1m3i.ndsBeot undaryless 4.00 .69 .88 -.03 .08 1m4o.bility Physical 3.43 .91 .81 .02 -.03 15. Institution -.27** -.10* Notes: *p < .05 (two-tailed); **p < .01 (two-tailed)
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